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FAO - UNCCD COP12 brochure










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    Project
    Fighting Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought through the Action Against Desertification - GCP/INT/157/EC 2021
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    In arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas of member states of the Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States (OACPS), inhabitants depend on land health and productivity, water and vegetation cover, as more than 70 percent of the population derives its livelihood from natural resources. These resources are threatened by Desertification, Land Degradation and Drought (DLDD), which, combined with human activity and environmental changes, cause soil loss, alterations in natural habitats and ecosystems, losses in biodiversity and a reduction in natural buffers to droughts and floods. This project was formulated to tackle desertification as a means of increasing the sustainable management of vital natural resources, combating hunger and improving resilience to climate change in eight OACPS member countries (Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Gambia, Niger, Nigeria and Senegal in Africa, Haiti in the Caribbean and Fiji in the Pacific). Thanks to a joint effort of The African Union Commission (AUC), the European Union, FAO and the Secretariat of the OACPS, the Action Against Desertification (AAD) project assisted beneficiary countries in contributing to the goals of their respective national action plans to combat desertification and in meeting their commitments to large-scale international conventions to restore degraded land.
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    Document
    Nature based solutions for restoration of degraded forests and biodiversity conservation
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Bush encroachment is a serious land degradation phenomenon affecting up to 45 million hectares of Namibian land and has severe negative consequences on key ecosystem services, threatening biodiversity, water resources and the livelihoods of communities and farmers who depend on the land. It has led to decreased biodiversity, degradation of the functions and structures of ecological ecosystems, lowering the grasslands’ carrying capacity, displacement of wildlife, as well as impacting groundwater recharge. Encroachers include species such as Senegalia erubescens, S. fleckii, Vachellia nilotica, V. luederitzii, V. reficiens, Colophospermum mopane, Rhigozum trichotomum, Terminalia prunioides, T. sericea, S. mellifera, and Dichrostachys cinerea.

    The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an international organisation promoting responsible forest management. FSC has been certifying forest management in savanna woodland and timber products produced such as charcoal in Namibia for 19 years, and has seen a rapid increase in forest management certification over the last 3 years. The poster will highlight the enabling conditions which contributed to the growth of approximately 1.5 million hectares (841%) of responsibly managed restoration efforts on FSC certified land in Namibia. This will include information on the FSC forest stewardship standard for Namibia developed by Namibian experts and stakeholders. The standard is focused on restoration of degraded forests and effective after-care measures and improved working conditions for workers. Information will also include supply chain integrity in charcoal supply chains from Namibia to European markets; biodiversity conservation via ecosystem services certification, development and implementation of user friendly technology to assist farmers with sustainable forest management practices and knowledge transfer; and how the use of materials developed by partners have assisted with best practices and local capacity development. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation, Knowledge management, Sustainable forest management, Partnerships, Value chain ID: 3486379
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    Book (series)
    Grazing with trees
    A silvopastoral approach to managing and restoring drylands
    2022
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    Trees in dryland forests and wooded areas provide key ecosystem services such as animal feed, timber, fruits and, regulation of soil and water cycles. Equally, the presence of livestock in dryland woody areas can also play an important role in the local ecosystem; not only are they a source of income for local communities, but they also help vegetation and mobilise stored biomass. When both of these ecosystem elements are wisely combined – livestock and trees – it creates an integrated agricultural system that can boost the local ecosystem, representing a welcome agro-ecological transition in livestock farming. The ‘Grazing with Trees’ report gives a thorough assessment of the positive role that optimized extensive grazing livestock farming can play in the management and restoration of drylands’ forests and lands with trees. It assesses and provides sound evidence on the benefits of applying an integrated landscape approach and utilizing farmers and pastoralists’ knowledge to halt desertification, increase resilience, and enhance food security under the actual changing scenario. The report confirms the importance of agroforestry as a primary pathway for forest restoration in dryland areas as recommended by FAO’s State of Forests 2022, and its recommendations encourage landscape planners and decision makers to consider livestock as allies, carefully restore tree cover and accelerate action to promote healthy ecosystems.

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