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Proceedings of the Regional Consultation on Sustainable Intensification of Aquaculture in Asia and the Pacific












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    Book (stand-alone)
    Sustainable intensification of aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region
    Documentation of successful practices
    2016
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    The publication is an important outputs of regional activity under the regional initiative on sustainable intensification of aquaculture for blue growth in Asia-Pacific. This publication is a very important information and knowledge product on sustainable intensification of aquaculture. The publication will greatly raise the awareness of stakeholders to existing good practices of sustainable intensification of aquaculture and their potential in contributing to sustainable growth of the industry for food security and nutrition, rural livelihood and overall social and economic development. The publication will disseminate the innovative practices of SIA and promote wide adoption of the innovative practices in the entire Asia-Pacific region. The publication contributes to Organizational Outcome 201 “Producers and natural resource managers adopt practices that increase and improve the provision of goods and services in agriculture sector production systems in a sustainable manner”–Output 2 0101 “Number of FAO-supported initiatives that used inclusive and participatory approaches to validate and facilitate uptake of innovative practices for sustainable agricultural production”.
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    Meeting
    Promote responsible production and use of feed and feed ingredients for sustainable growth of aquaculture in Asia-Pacific. Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission Thirty-fifth session (APFIC)
    Cebu, the Philippines, 11-13 May 2018
    2018
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    Aquaculture has been one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the past three decades globally. The annual growth rate was at an average of 8 percent from 1984 to 2014. As the major contributor to the world aquaculture production, Asia achieved an average annual growth of 8.4 percent in the same period, and the production reached 92.8 tonnes in 2014, accounting for 91.7 percent. Currently, Asian aquaculture supplies some 60 percent of food fish for consumption while contributing significantly to rural livelihood. The rapid production growth has been largely attributed to intensification of production with increasing dependence on artificial feeding. Finfish and crustacean are two major groups of cultured aquatic animals that require artificial feeding, in the forms of commercial feeds, farm-made feeds, and fresh feeds. Their global production reached 56.8 million tonnes in 2014, including some 6.92 million tonnes of crustacean and 49.9 million tonnes of finfish. With silver carp, catla and bighead (filter feeder on plankton) excluded, it was estimated that 38.8 million tonnes of finfish out of the total 49.9 million tonnes were produced through entire or partial feeding based on the feeding habit and common culture practices. Therefore, aquaculture commodities produced through partial or complete feeding accounted for 45.2 percent globally in 2014, while it was only 42.5 percent 10 years ago. The total production of aquaculture species depending on artificial feeding has increased by 97.9 percent in the past 10 years.
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    Book (series)
    World aquaculture 2010 2011
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    Global production of fish from aquaculture has grown substantially in the past decade, reaching 52.5 million tonnes in 2008, compared with 32.4 million tonnes in 2000. Aquaculture continues to be the fastest-growing animal food producing sector and currently accounts for nearly half (45.6 percent) of the world’s food fish consumption, compared with 33.8 percent in 2000. The Asia–Pacific region continues to dominate the aquaculture sector, accounting for 89.1 percent of global productio n, with China alone contributing 62.3 percent of global production. Moreover, of the 15 leading aquacultureproducing countries, 11 are in the Asia–Pacific region. A few countries dominate the production of some major species, such as carps by China; shrimps and prawns by China, India, Indonesia, Thailand and Viet Nam; and salmon by Chile and Norway. In terms of farming systems, extensive, intensive and semi-intensive systems are practised in all regions. In the Asia–Pacific region, d espite major technical developments in the aquaculture sector, small-scale commercial producers continue to remain the backbone of the sector, contributing the bulk of aquaculture production. In the past decade, a number of developments have contributed to the significant growth of the global aquaculture sector, namely: formulation and implementation of policies, strategies, plans and legislation; dissemination and use of applied research; and emergence of new domestic and internatio nal markets. Achieving the global aquaculture sector’s long-term goal of economic, social and environmental sustainability depends primarily on continued commitments by governments to provide and support a good governance framework for the sector. It is encouraging that the experience of the past decade indicates that many governments remain committed to good governance. As the sector further expands, intensifies and diversifies, it should recognize the relevant environmental and socia l concerns and make conscious efforts to address them in a transparent manner, backed with scientific evidence. This document provides an overview of global aquaculture status and development trends as a synthesis of such status and trends in six regions of the world: Asia–Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Near East and North Africa, North America and Sub-Saharan Africa.

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