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    Near East and North Africa Land and Water Days
    Amman, Jordan, 15-18 December, 2013
    2013
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    For many centuries, the people of the Near East and North Africa (NENA) Region were able to cope, and even flourish, under conditions of water scarcity. However, with decades of relentless high rate of population growth, rapid urbanization, and uncharacteristically excessive consumption patterns, the region is now facing unprecedented levels of pressure on its natural resources. Adding the looming threat of climate change to these pressures, the achievement of effective management of land and wa ter that ensures efficient utilization of the resources and leads to sustainable food security, has become a necessity. Though the region has accumulated a wealth of knowledge on management systems that can support its pursue of sound and sustainable land and water productivity, unfortunately, many of the successful experiences are limited in scope and space, or not well documented or disseminated. This situation has resulted in a significant knowledge gap. The Near East and North Africa Land an d Water Days (NENA-LWD), which are in line with the 2013 UN-International year for water cooperation and are closely linked to FAO Initiative on Water Scarcity in the Near East (2013), had the aim of filling, the above mentioned, land and water management knowledge gap. These days, which took place from 15-18 December 2013 at Amman, Jordan, built on the FAO global Land and Water Days held in May 2012 in Rome in cooperation with IFAD and WFP. Twelve technical sessions that addressed critical issu es related to Land and Water management were conducted during the NENA LWD. The sessions, which had around fifty keynote speakers and high caliber Experts, were designed to allow for long and detailed discussions around carefully selected case studies from around the Region. The main aim is to identify the success and failure of the applied approaches, tools, or methods and discuss the potential of up-scaling the success stories. The output of these sessions will feed into the Regional Collabora tive Strategy. Numerous recommendations came out of these sessions; the following are some of the most frequent: pilot applications; full and comprehensive involvement of stakholders; harmonizing policies and creating synergies among various initiatives; need for Regional Strategy for the utilization of shared aquifers; importance of conflict resolution mechanism among stakeholders, establishment of incentive systems for adoption of research findings.
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    Book (series)
    Report of the twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, 5-9 March 2007. 2008
    The twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) was held in Rome, Italy, from 5 to 9 March 2007. The Committee reviewed the issues of an international character and the programme of work of FAO/FI in fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to the further work to facilitate and ensure the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its International Plans of Action (IPOAs) (on capacity; illegal, unreported and unregulated [IUU] fishing; sharks; and seabirds ), COFI welcomed the pending submission of a general multi-year programme of work on genetic resource management in fisheries and aquaculture. The Committee expressed concern about the level of fishing capacity which was higher than prior to the 2004 tsunami in some of the areas affected by the disaster and recognized that it called for (with FAO assistance as required) the design and implementation of sustainable and effective fisheries management arrangements that included a gradually phasing out fishing overcapacity, monitoring, access and livelihood considerations. COFI also referred to the issue of safety-at-sea in relation to the use of sub-standard vessels. The Committee recognized the importance of traceability for fish trade and welcomed the Memorandum of Understanding between FAO and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Committee reaffirmed its trust in FAO to play a coordinating role in advancing the global aquacu lture agenda and highlighted the importance of addressing socio-economic impacts of aquaculture and other issues, such as improving planning and policy development at national and regional levels. The Committee agreed to give greater attention to small-scale fisheries and welcomed the convening of a broad-based international conference focusing specifically on small-scale fisheries. The Committee encouraged Members to join or cooperate with the voluntary International Monitoring, Control and Sur veillance (MCS) Network and to develop a new legally binding instrument based on the Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing and the IPOA??UU. The Committee identified several areas for further work on issues related to the ecosystem approach to fisheries. The Committee found the level of the budget assigned to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department unsatisfactory and not commensurate with the importance of its work and the expectations of the international community, and mad e a strong request that the relevant FAO Governing Bodies allocate more resources to the Department.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, 5–9 March 2007. 2008
    The twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) was held in Rome, Italy, from 5 to 9 March 2007. The Committee reviewed the issues of an international character and the programme of work of FAO/FI in fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to the further work to facilitate and ensure the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its International Plans of Action (IPOAs) (on capacity; illegal, unreported and unregulated [IUU] fishing; sharks; and seabirds), COFI welcomed the pending submission of a general multi-year programme of work on genetic resource management in fisheries and aquaculture. The Committee expressed concern about the level of fishing capacity which was higher than prior to the 2004 tsunami in some of the areas affected by the disaster and recognized that it called for (with FAO assistance as required) the design and implementation of sustainable and effective fisheries management arrangements that included a gradually phasing out fishing overcapacity, monitoring, access and livelihood considerations. COFI also referred to the issue of safety-at-sea in relation to the use of sub-standard vessels. The Committee recognized the importance of traceability for fish trade and welcomed the Memorandum of Understanding between FAO and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Committee reaffirmed its trust in FAO to play a coordinating role in advancing the global aquaculture agenda and highlighted the importance of addressing socio-economic impacts of aquaculture and other issues, such as improving planning and policy development at national and regional levels. The Committee agreed to give greater attention to small-scale fisheries and welcomed the convening of a broad-based international conference focusing specifically on small-scale fisheries. The Committee encouraged Members to join or cooperate with the voluntar y International Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) Network and to develop a new legally binding instrument based on the Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing and the IPOA–IUU. The Committee identified several areas for further work on issues related to the ecosystem approach to fisheries. The Committee found the level of the budget assigned to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department unsatisfactory and not commensurate with the importance of its work and t he expectations of the international community, and made a strong request that the relevant FAO Governing Bodies allocate more resources to the Department. 9 78 9 2 5 1 0 5 7 3 8 4 TR/M/A1160E/1/06.07/1400 ISBN 978-92-5-105738-4 ISSN 0429-9337
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Near East and North Africa Land and Water Days
    Amman, Jordan, 15-18 December, 2013
    2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    For many centuries, the people of the Near East and North Africa (NENA) Region were able to cope, and even flourish, under conditions of water scarcity. However, with decades of relentless high rate of population growth, rapid urbanization, and uncharacteristically excessive consumption patterns, the region is now facing unprecedented levels of pressure on its natural resources. Adding the looming threat of climate change to these pressures, the achievement of effective management of land and wa ter that ensures efficient utilization of the resources and leads to sustainable food security, has become a necessity. Though the region has accumulated a wealth of knowledge on management systems that can support its pursue of sound and sustainable land and water productivity, unfortunately, many of the successful experiences are limited in scope and space, or not well documented or disseminated. This situation has resulted in a significant knowledge gap. The Near East and North Africa Land an d Water Days (NENA-LWD), which are in line with the 2013 UN-International year for water cooperation and are closely linked to FAO Initiative on Water Scarcity in the Near East (2013), had the aim of filling, the above mentioned, land and water management knowledge gap. These days, which took place from 15-18 December 2013 at Amman, Jordan, built on the FAO global Land and Water Days held in May 2012 in Rome in cooperation with IFAD and WFP. Twelve technical sessions that addressed critical issu es related to Land and Water management were conducted during the NENA LWD. The sessions, which had around fifty keynote speakers and high caliber Experts, were designed to allow for long and detailed discussions around carefully selected case studies from around the Region. The main aim is to identify the success and failure of the applied approaches, tools, or methods and discuss the potential of up-scaling the success stories. The output of these sessions will feed into the Regional Collabora tive Strategy. Numerous recommendations came out of these sessions; the following are some of the most frequent: pilot applications; full and comprehensive involvement of stakholders; harmonizing policies and creating synergies among various initiatives; need for Regional Strategy for the utilization of shared aquifers; importance of conflict resolution mechanism among stakeholders, establishment of incentive systems for adoption of research findings.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, 5-9 March 2007. 2008
    The twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) was held in Rome, Italy, from 5 to 9 March 2007. The Committee reviewed the issues of an international character and the programme of work of FAO/FI in fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to the further work to facilitate and ensure the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its International Plans of Action (IPOAs) (on capacity; illegal, unreported and unregulated [IUU] fishing; sharks; and seabirds ), COFI welcomed the pending submission of a general multi-year programme of work on genetic resource management in fisheries and aquaculture. The Committee expressed concern about the level of fishing capacity which was higher than prior to the 2004 tsunami in some of the areas affected by the disaster and recognized that it called for (with FAO assistance as required) the design and implementation of sustainable and effective fisheries management arrangements that included a gradually phasing out fishing overcapacity, monitoring, access and livelihood considerations. COFI also referred to the issue of safety-at-sea in relation to the use of sub-standard vessels. The Committee recognized the importance of traceability for fish trade and welcomed the Memorandum of Understanding between FAO and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Committee reaffirmed its trust in FAO to play a coordinating role in advancing the global aquacu lture agenda and highlighted the importance of addressing socio-economic impacts of aquaculture and other issues, such as improving planning and policy development at national and regional levels. The Committee agreed to give greater attention to small-scale fisheries and welcomed the convening of a broad-based international conference focusing specifically on small-scale fisheries. The Committee encouraged Members to join or cooperate with the voluntary International Monitoring, Control and Sur veillance (MCS) Network and to develop a new legally binding instrument based on the Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing and the IPOA??UU. The Committee identified several areas for further work on issues related to the ecosystem approach to fisheries. The Committee found the level of the budget assigned to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department unsatisfactory and not commensurate with the importance of its work and the expectations of the international community, and mad e a strong request that the relevant FAO Governing Bodies allocate more resources to the Department.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, 5–9 March 2007. 2008
    The twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) was held in Rome, Italy, from 5 to 9 March 2007. The Committee reviewed the issues of an international character and the programme of work of FAO/FI in fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to the further work to facilitate and ensure the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its International Plans of Action (IPOAs) (on capacity; illegal, unreported and unregulated [IUU] fishing; sharks; and seabirds), COFI welcomed the pending submission of a general multi-year programme of work on genetic resource management in fisheries and aquaculture. The Committee expressed concern about the level of fishing capacity which was higher than prior to the 2004 tsunami in some of the areas affected by the disaster and recognized that it called for (with FAO assistance as required) the design and implementation of sustainable and effective fisheries management arrangements that included a gradually phasing out fishing overcapacity, monitoring, access and livelihood considerations. COFI also referred to the issue of safety-at-sea in relation to the use of sub-standard vessels. The Committee recognized the importance of traceability for fish trade and welcomed the Memorandum of Understanding between FAO and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Committee reaffirmed its trust in FAO to play a coordinating role in advancing the global aquaculture agenda and highlighted the importance of addressing socio-economic impacts of aquaculture and other issues, such as improving planning and policy development at national and regional levels. The Committee agreed to give greater attention to small-scale fisheries and welcomed the convening of a broad-based international conference focusing specifically on small-scale fisheries. The Committee encouraged Members to join or cooperate with the voluntar y International Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) Network and to develop a new legally binding instrument based on the Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing and the IPOA–IUU. The Committee identified several areas for further work on issues related to the ecosystem approach to fisheries. The Committee found the level of the budget assigned to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department unsatisfactory and not commensurate with the importance of its work and t he expectations of the international community, and made a strong request that the relevant FAO Governing Bodies allocate more resources to the Department. 9 78 9 2 5 1 0 5 7 3 8 4 TR/M/A1160E/1/06.07/1400 ISBN 978-92-5-105738-4 ISSN 0429-9337
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Near East and North Africa Land and Water Days
    Amman, Jordan, 15-18 December, 2013
    2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    For many centuries, the people of the Near East and North Africa (NENA) Region were able to cope, and even flourish, under conditions of water scarcity. However, with decades of relentless high rate of population growth, rapid urbanization, and uncharacteristically excessive consumption patterns, the region is now facing unprecedented levels of pressure on its natural resources. Adding the looming threat of climate change to these pressures, the achievement of effective management of land and wa ter that ensures efficient utilization of the resources and leads to sustainable food security, has become a necessity. Though the region has accumulated a wealth of knowledge on management systems that can support its pursue of sound and sustainable land and water productivity, unfortunately, many of the successful experiences are limited in scope and space, or not well documented or disseminated. This situation has resulted in a significant knowledge gap. The Near East and North Africa Land an d Water Days (NENA-LWD), which are in line with the 2013 UN-International year for water cooperation and are closely linked to FAO Initiative on Water Scarcity in the Near East (2013), had the aim of filling, the above mentioned, land and water management knowledge gap. These days, which took place from 15-18 December 2013 at Amman, Jordan, built on the FAO global Land and Water Days held in May 2012 in Rome in cooperation with IFAD and WFP. Twelve technical sessions that addressed critical issu es related to Land and Water management were conducted during the NENA LWD. The sessions, which had around fifty keynote speakers and high caliber Experts, were designed to allow for long and detailed discussions around carefully selected case studies from around the Region. The main aim is to identify the success and failure of the applied approaches, tools, or methods and discuss the potential of up-scaling the success stories. The output of these sessions will feed into the Regional Collabora tive Strategy. Numerous recommendations came out of these sessions; the following are some of the most frequent: pilot applications; full and comprehensive involvement of stakholders; harmonizing policies and creating synergies among various initiatives; need for Regional Strategy for the utilization of shared aquifers; importance of conflict resolution mechanism among stakeholders, establishment of incentive systems for adoption of research findings.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, 5-9 March 2007. 2008
    The twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) was held in Rome, Italy, from 5 to 9 March 2007. The Committee reviewed the issues of an international character and the programme of work of FAO/FI in fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to the further work to facilitate and ensure the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its International Plans of Action (IPOAs) (on capacity; illegal, unreported and unregulated [IUU] fishing; sharks; and seabirds ), COFI welcomed the pending submission of a general multi-year programme of work on genetic resource management in fisheries and aquaculture. The Committee expressed concern about the level of fishing capacity which was higher than prior to the 2004 tsunami in some of the areas affected by the disaster and recognized that it called for (with FAO assistance as required) the design and implementation of sustainable and effective fisheries management arrangements that included a gradually phasing out fishing overcapacity, monitoring, access and livelihood considerations. COFI also referred to the issue of safety-at-sea in relation to the use of sub-standard vessels. The Committee recognized the importance of traceability for fish trade and welcomed the Memorandum of Understanding between FAO and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Committee reaffirmed its trust in FAO to play a coordinating role in advancing the global aquacu lture agenda and highlighted the importance of addressing socio-economic impacts of aquaculture and other issues, such as improving planning and policy development at national and regional levels. The Committee agreed to give greater attention to small-scale fisheries and welcomed the convening of a broad-based international conference focusing specifically on small-scale fisheries. The Committee encouraged Members to join or cooperate with the voluntary International Monitoring, Control and Sur veillance (MCS) Network and to develop a new legally binding instrument based on the Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing and the IPOA??UU. The Committee identified several areas for further work on issues related to the ecosystem approach to fisheries. The Committee found the level of the budget assigned to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department unsatisfactory and not commensurate with the importance of its work and the expectations of the international community, and mad e a strong request that the relevant FAO Governing Bodies allocate more resources to the Department.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Report of the twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries. Rome, 5–9 March 2007. 2008
    The twenty-seventh session of the Committee on Fisheries (COFI) was held in Rome, Italy, from 5 to 9 March 2007. The Committee reviewed the issues of an international character and the programme of work of FAO/FI in fisheries and aquaculture. In addition to the further work to facilitate and ensure the implementation of the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and its International Plans of Action (IPOAs) (on capacity; illegal, unreported and unregulated [IUU] fishing; sharks; and seabirds), COFI welcomed the pending submission of a general multi-year programme of work on genetic resource management in fisheries and aquaculture. The Committee expressed concern about the level of fishing capacity which was higher than prior to the 2004 tsunami in some of the areas affected by the disaster and recognized that it called for (with FAO assistance as required) the design and implementation of sustainable and effective fisheries management arrangements that included a gradually phasing out fishing overcapacity, monitoring, access and livelihood considerations. COFI also referred to the issue of safety-at-sea in relation to the use of sub-standard vessels. The Committee recognized the importance of traceability for fish trade and welcomed the Memorandum of Understanding between FAO and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The Committee reaffirmed its trust in FAO to play a coordinating role in advancing the global aquaculture agenda and highlighted the importance of addressing socio-economic impacts of aquaculture and other issues, such as improving planning and policy development at national and regional levels. The Committee agreed to give greater attention to small-scale fisheries and welcomed the convening of a broad-based international conference focusing specifically on small-scale fisheries. The Committee encouraged Members to join or cooperate with the voluntar y International Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) Network and to develop a new legally binding instrument based on the Model Scheme on Port State Measures to Combat IUU Fishing and the IPOA–IUU. The Committee identified several areas for further work on issues related to the ecosystem approach to fisheries. The Committee found the level of the budget assigned to the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department unsatisfactory and not commensurate with the importance of its work and t he expectations of the international community, and made a strong request that the relevant FAO Governing Bodies allocate more resources to the Department. 9 78 9 2 5 1 0 5 7 3 8 4 TR/M/A1160E/1/06.07/1400 ISBN 978-92-5-105738-4 ISSN 0429-9337

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