Thumbnail Image

FAO Nigeria Newsletter, July 2022 - Issue #6











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Newsletter
    FAO Nigeria Newsletter, March 2021 - Issue #3 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This is a third edition of FAO Nigeria e-newsletter covering the period of Jan - March 2021. In this issue, you will read about how our Rainy Farming Season support in the northeast part of the country is helping the communities affected by the decade-long insurgency to resettle. We are also excited to see that the Federal Government is pleased with the Cadre Harminse (CH) exercise and that it has approved its extension to all the states in the country. This is good step for getting the real picture of food security and nutrition in the country for appropriate actions. Besides, although the March 2021 CH results show slight improvements in some northeast Nigeria areas, there is a still a need to take immediate action to address the situation before it worsens. During this time too, Nigeria started the Food Systems Summit dialogues and many more are expected to take place in the country ahead of the UN’s Global Food Systems Summit in September this year. Please read on for these and more reports including the visits by the FAO Representative to Ondo and Cross River States with the aim of strengthening partnerships for ensuring improved food security, nutrition and sustainable natural resources management, and the 2021 International Day of Forests celebrations in Nigeria
  • Thumbnail Image
    Newsletter
    FAO Nigeria Newsletter, October 2021 - Issue #4
    Special Edition on World Food Day Celebrations for 2021
    2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    It is another important time of the year when we celebrate the World Food Day (WFD) i.e. October 16, which is also the FAO’s birth date. The day is marked by a series of activities for promoting worldwide awareness and action for elimination of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition. The WFD 2021 came just a few weeks after the United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres, convened the first ever Food Systems Summit that was held on September 23, 2021. With the theme ‘Our actions are our future. Better production, better nutrition, a better environment, and a better life’, this year’s WFD was a time to look into the future we need to build together. This year the day was celebrated by looking at the agri-food systems and the important role that they play in ensuring food security, nutrition and environmental sustainability. FAO in Nigeria led preparations and holding of a series of activities in the week leading up to the day in collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, United Nations Information Centre, Office of the United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, International Fund for Agricultural Development, World Food Programme and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). They ranged from a joint ministerial press conference, commissioning and handing-over of water points to internally displaced people and their host communities, handing over of IT equipment to support food security and nutrition-related SDGs monitoring and signing of a Technical Cooperation Programme to support drip irrigation farming in Nigeria. Others included a field visit and award giving ceremony to best performers in the school gardening project, a high-level panel discussion and participation in agricultural show, among other activities. Please read on...
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Stories of change: Building competence and confidence in agricultural innovation 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This book tells stories. Stories from very many people. Stories of change – triggered by this complex project, Capacity Development for Agricultural Innovation Systems (CDAIS). The stories relate to changes. Personal change. Organizational change. Changes in attitudes. Changes in practice. They tell of improvements in livelihoods. But more importantly, they tell of positive and appreciated changes in individual and organizational approaches – in how people see things and do things. They give some examples of the rich learning experiences stimulated by the CDAIS project, but of course don’t show them all. Also, each is only a ‘snapshot’ – having been written and published on www. cdais.net at different times over the past 12 months, though some have been updated, others show where people were at that point in time. But they all show how competence – but perhaps more importantly – confidence – amongst those involved has changed. Though the main aim of the CDAIS project was to test how and in what ways the approach used worked (or didn’t work), how it could be improved, and in what ways the results could help donors when deciding on the design of future projects. But this is not the purpose of this book. Other publications will explain that in detail. This book just tells stories, with images and testimonies from the field. The ‘end users’, ‘beneficiaries’ or whatever other impersonal terms some in ‘development’ want to call them – the people – here, they air their views. In context. Honestly. Frankly. And, as it seems, positively. But this would not have been possible without the great efforts of very many people. First and foremost are the 40 contributors we have supported – almost all ‘national innovation facilitators’ trained by CDAIS to implement innovation in agricultural systems, to collect these stories. And we are so very proud of their achievements, and the help provided by many others within Agrinatura, national partner organisations, and others in the partnerships concerned. And even after working in rural development for 30 years, some of these experiences have moved us deeply. We are seeing real change. Of that there is no doubt. “Other projects bring us machines, but CDAIS brings us knowledge and a new way of working together” was a common thread to many of the conversations. “And thanks to that it has helped us so much. Thank you.” I visited six of the eight pilot countries during the preparation of this work, so can vouch personally, for many of the testimonies. And as for seeing the faces of those as they spoke the words that are included in the book, the photographs can’t do them justice. I saw the impacts. And now you can seen them too. Enjoy! Nick Pasiecznik, editor

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.