Thumbnail Image

Zambian Basic Education Course, NUTRITION EDUCATION, Supplementary Material - Teacher’s Book Grade 2









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Zambia Nutrition Education - Grade 4 - Teacher's Book 2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    These education materials are intended to help tackle the widespread problem of malnutrition among Zambian school children. They are based on the basic school classroom curriculum for nutrition education as identified by teachers, heads teachers, local nutritionists and education standards officers. The geographical area targeted was Luapula but most of the issues apply equally to other Zambian provinces. Many school-age children in Zambia suffer from malnutrition. Particularly common pro blems are protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), vitamin A deficiency and iron deficiency. Children with these deficiencies are stunted (small for their age), do not grow well, are vulnerable to disease, are often listless and inattentive and do not do well at school. They may also have other more specific health problems, such as poor eyesight and anaemia. The reason for these dietary deficiencies may be that children do not get enough to eat, but even more that their diet does not give them the variety of foods they need. Another problem is that many schoolchildren do not eat frequently enough. Children need to eat often to maintain their energy levels, yet even when food is available in the home, many children go to school without breakfast; some eat only one meal a day1. This has a detrimental effect on their learning as well as on their long-term growth and health. These nutritional conditions are aggravated by other health problems. Widespread diarrhoeal diseases contri bute to malnutrition and put lives at risk; these infections (and others) are spread by poor personal and environmental hygiene and sanitation. Malaria, like other serious diseases, causes loss of appetite, weakens the body and can lead to protein-energy malnutrition. Malaria is also one of the major causes of anaemia in malaria-endemic areas such as Luapula. Prevention and correct treatment of these diseases can therefore improve nutritional wellbeing considerably.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    State of school-based food and nutrition education in 30 low- and middle-income countries
    Survey report
    2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Progressively more countries are reportedly incorporating school-based food and nutrition education (SFNE) into their education, nutrition and school feeding policies, acknowledging its role in impacting children’s food outlooks and practices, and that of their parents, families and the community. Despite this increasing interest and global recognition, there is no clear picture of SFNE implementation at school level, which makes it challenging to identify gaps, take corrective measures, make reforms or introduce new policy initiatives. Framed under FAO’s school food and nutrition work, the aim of the survey was to determine the current role, approach, scope and linkages of government run SFNE in a sample of low- and middle-income countries. In particular, this survey is part of the package of outputs that FAO developed to establish the foundation for reshaping and carrying the SFNE work forward, in terms of effectiveness and scope.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.