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Rapfish, a rapid appraisal technique for fisheries, and its application to the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries.










Pitcher, T.J. Rapfish, a rapid appraisal technique for fisheries, and its application to the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. FAO Fisheries Circular. No. 947. Rome, FAO. 1999. 47p.


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    The Participatory Rapid Appraisal on perceptions and practices of fisherfolk on fishery resource management in an artisanal fishing community in Cameroon 1994
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    The PRA (Participatory Rapid Appraisal) exercise that was held in Mabeta in April-May 1994, looked at the perceptions, attitudes and practices of the fisherfolk in this community towards the management of their fishery resource. The results will contribute to the elaboration of a set of indicators favouring a positive and consistent attitude on fishery resource management. On this base a set of recommendations for the implementation of a sustainable community-based management strategy for the fishery resource can be built up. The second objective of this activity was to offer training and relevant experience in PRA techniques to national staff. The hypothesis of the above mentioned PRA exercises is built on the assumption that the attitude and practice of the fisherfolk towards the management of their fish resource will be partly determined by the social organisation of their communities. The social organisation of many fishing communities in West Africa is determ ined by the important migration, characteristic for the sector and the region. The different social settings resulting from this phenomenon, will influence the attitude and practice of the fisherfolk on fishery resource management in a different way.
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    A manual on rapid appraisal methods for coastal communities - BOBP\MAG\6 1987
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    Rapid Rural Appraisal, or RRA, is a repertoire of rapid approaches to collecting information and identifying problems. It is increasingly being used by development agencies, government departments and non-government organisations (NGOs ) the world over to learn about conditions ‘in the field’. Until now, it has most frequently been applied in agricultural communities and rural areas (thus, Rapid Rural Appraisal). However, as it gains acceptance, it is being used in a wider range of situations an d conditions. It has been used to find out more about urban communities and to look at problems outside the agricultural sector, in such areas as forestry, health, nutrition, family planning and small industry development. Until now, RRA techniques have rarely been applied, in a systematic way, in coastal communities and, in particular, in the fisheries sector. But, interestingly, some of the techniques which make up the RRA approach are already in use by individuals or groups involved in fisher ies development. Many people working in fisheries development also have their own techniques for collecting information and arriving at conclusions which could and should be included in the RRA repertoire. What has been lacking so far are attempts to use RRA systematically in looking at fishing communities, their way of life and livelihood, and the coastal ecosystems in which they live
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    Review of Tropical Reservoirs and Their Fisheries - The cases of Lake Nasser, Lake Volta and Indo-Gangetic Basin Reservoirs. 2011
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    Freshwaters contribute 15 percent of the world’s reported fish catch, or about 10.1 million tonnes in 2006, most of which comes from tropical systems. The true contribution of tropical inland fisheries is likely to be higher, as less than half of the inland capture production is actually reported. While reservoir fisheries are already an essential component of this production, the potential of most of them may even exceed their current catch levels. Opportunities exist to increase prod uctivity, provided that environmentally and socially sustainable management systems can be adopted. To realize this untapped potential, it is necessary to improve understanding of the processes influencing reservoir productivity in such a way as to involve both biological principles and stakeholder participation, as each reservoir has different properties and different research and management institutions. Seen in isolation, catch and productivity data of individual reservoirs may be difficult to interpret. The present technical paper attempts to address this issue by reviewing the knowledge accumulated in reservoirs in some very different tropical river basins: the Indus and Ganges/Brahmaputra Basin in India, the Nile River Basin in Eastern Africa and the Volta River Basin in West Africa. In particular, it focuses on many of the reservoirs of northern India and Pakistan in the Indus and Ganges systems, Lake Nasser in the Nile River and Lake Volta in the Volta R iver. Information collated from grey and published literature on the three basins is synthesized and standardized with reference to wider knowledge and up-to-date information on tropical reservoir fisheries. A considerable quantity of data and information were collected on many aspects of the systems of the three reservoirs, including hydrological, biophysical and limnological features, primary production, and fish and fisheries data. This information was condensed and synthesized wi th the aim of providing a baseline against which the ecological changes that have taken place since impoundment can be described and analysed. Efforts are made to explain changes in fish catch in relation to climatic variations, ecological succession and fishing effort. The review shows that biological data and information are generally available. However, as is also common elsewhere, all three cases suffer from the general tendency to isolate and compartmentalize research into separ ate disciplines. Usually, there is very limited cross-disciplinary flow of information or recognition of how results of various disciplines can contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the behaviour of fish populations, human communities and ecosystems and the productive activities that depend on them. This uniform tendency severely hampered the identification of relevant management actions. A more pragmatic and holistic understanding of reservoir ecosystems is needed in order to guide the choice of indicators and the development of monitoring systems that can inform management of changes in reservoir productivity and, hence, the potential catch. The next step would be to devise a hierarchy of indicators describing the different ecological and economic processes influencing fisheries catches and to organize monitoring systems around those indicators. Only by combining information across sectoral disciplines will it be possible to reach a better unders tanding of the processes that drive fish stocks, fisheries and reservoir productivity.

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