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Preservation of fruits: shelf-stable pineapple puree










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    Policy brief
    Reducing food loss and valorizing fruits and residues to boost pineapple industry sustainability and profitability 2024
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    Pineapples, like other tropical fruits, are susceptible to food loss and waste due to their high moisture content and perishable nature. Factors including climate change, inadequate infrastructure, and handling during harvesting, packaging and transportation increase the risk of food loss, impacting fruit supply and quality. Embracing strategies to reduce losses and maximize the use of non-marketable and damaged pineapple fruit and residues is a win-win for businesses and global sustainability objectives including food security and climate action. By reducing losses, producers and businesses can also increase their competitiveness and resilience and enhance their reputation with markets and customers. This technical brief presents practical ideas on how stakeholders operating in pineapple value chains can minimize food loss and valorize residues.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Handling and preservation of fruits and vegetables by combined methods for rural areas
    Technical Manual
    2003
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    This manual is intended to surve as a guide to farmers and processors of fruits and vegetables in rural areas. It contains basic but valuable information on post-harvest handling and marketing operations and storage of fresh and processed products. It provides practical examples of preserving fruits and vegetables addressing a combination of factors, highlighting technology which, when combined, has a positive and synergistic effect in preventing biochemical and physiochemical reactions and micr obial growth - the main causes of quality losses in fruits and vegetables. The suggested methodologies combine technologies such as mild heat treatment, water activity reduction (aw), lowering of the pH and use of anti-microbial substances to realize the potential of minimally processed, high-moisture fruit products. These relatively new technologies have been successfully applied to several important tropical and non-tropical fruits in different countries of Latin America and are considered app ropriate and recommended for use in other fruit-producing countries around the world.
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    Project
    Strengthening Pineapple Production for Farmers in Vanuatu - TCP/VAN/3503 2019
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    In the aftermath of the devastating Cyclone Pam in 2015, the Government of Vanuatu intensified its support to the fruit and vegetable sector. Pineapple was identified as being particularly resilient to severe weather and as having excellent production and market potential. However, the lack of knowledge among farmers and agribusinesses on how to grow sustainably and profitably and how to add value to pineapples made it necessary to strengthen capacity in the sector. The project targeted both the public and private sectors, with a view to helping farmers to produce and sell fresh and processed pineapple products on Vanuatu’s domestic market.

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