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Forests and family farming

Committee on Forestry, 22nd Session










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    Talking about Forests and Family Farms: Growing Relations on Fertile Ground. A conversation between forest and farm producers and governments at the "Family Forestry is Family Farming" event, Thursday 26th June 2014, World Forest Week, FAO, Rome 2014
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    This publication summarizes the conversation that took place at the “Family Forestry is Family Farming” event co-organized by the Forest and Farm Facility (FFF) and the International Family Forestry Alliance (IFFA). In the celebration of the International Year of Family Farming (IYFF), the conversation testifies to the power of cooperation between forest-and-farm families and governments in preparing fertile ground.
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    What do we really know about the number and distribution of farms and family farms worldwide?
    Background paper for The State of Food and Agriculture 2014
    2014
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    The agricultural economics literature provides various estimates of the number of farms and small farms in the world. This paper is an effort to provide a more complete and up to date as well as carefully documented estimate of the total number of farms in the world, as well as by region and level of income. It uses data from numerous rounds of the World Census of Agriculture, the only dataset available which allows the user to gain a complete picture of the total number of farms globally and at the country level. The paper provides estimates of the number of family farms, the number of farms by size as well as the distibution of farmland by farm size. These estimates find that: there are at least 570 million farms worldwide, of which more than 500 million can be considered family farms. Most of the world’s farms are very small, with more than 475 million farms being less than 2 hectares in size. Although the vast majority of the world’s farms are smaller than 2 hectares, they operat e only a small share of the world’s farmland. Farmland distribution would seem quite unequal at the global level, but it is less so in low- and lower-middle-income countries as well as in some regional groups. These estimates have serious limitations and the collection of more up-to-date agricultural census data, including data on farmland distribution is essential to our having a more representative picture of the number of farms, the number of family farms and farm size as well as farmland dis tribution worldwide.
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    Land, Territorial Development and Family Farming in Angola
    A holistic approach to community-based natural resource governance: The cases of Bie, Huambo, and Huila Provinces
    2014
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    Land has always been central to the social and economic development of any country. However as global pressures on land and natural resources are increasing, land issues, in particular land governance, are receiving growing international attention. Despite the legal frameworks that determine how land is accessed, secured and used, significant gaps remain between the intent of these laws and policies and their effective implementation. It is this failure of implementation which often leads to the further marginalization of underrepresented groups and the exacerbation of conflict over land. Angola is no exception: nine years have passed since the new land law was published, six years since it was regulated, and yet a very limited application of the legal package that protects and guarantees the rights of rural communities has been put into practice by the Angolan government. For family farming in Angola, which is by far the most significant sector in Angola’s agriculture system, these po licy and institutional shortcomings add further complexity to an already difficult rural existence. Increasing impacts from climate change, land tenure conflicts from foreign agricultural investment, and food insecurity are challenges faced by Angolan family farmers, which are exacerbated by incomplete implementation of the legal frameworks related to land and natural resources.

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