Thumbnail Image

Cassava Diseases in Africa

a major threat to food security







Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    CASSAVA DISEASES in central, eastern and southern Africa (CaCESA)
    Strategic programme framework 2010-2015
    2010
    Also available in:

    This regional strategic programme framework, entitled “Cassava diseases in central, eastern and southern Africaâ€Â (CaCESA), has been prepared by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It aims to assist countries aff ected by cassava pests and diseases. These are signifi cantly aff ecting groups such as internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees and the vulnerable whose food security is threatened. CaCESA is designed to assist vulnerable farm families in selected districts of 15 countries1 in central, eastern and southern Africa. These countries are categorized in two groups: (i) countries already aff ected by the Ugandan variant of eastern Africa cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-Ug) and cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) diseases and where some mitigation activities are ongoing (Burundi, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda); and (ii) countries threatened by the spread and progress of cassava diseas es (Angola, Central African Republic, Gabon, Malawi, Mozambique, Sudan, Zambia and Zimbabwe).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Protecting cassava, a neglected crop, from pests and diseases 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is the fifth most produced staple food crop in the world, being a basic source of staple food for an estimated 800 million people worldwide. Cassava is an increasingly popular crop. Cassava is grown by smallholder farmers in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Thanks to its efficient use of water and soil nutrients and tolerance to drought, cassava can produce reasonable yields using limited or no inputs, even in areas with poor soils and unpredictable rainfall. Like other crops, cassava is vulnerable to pests and diseases that can cause heavy yield losses. Insect pests such as white flies and mealybugs, and diseases caused by viruses and phytoplasma, affect the production of cassava worldwide. Of the viral diseases, Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) are the most widespread, severely affecting at least 50 percent of cassava crops in Africa. CMD and CBSD pose a serious threat to the food security of 135 million people in Central and East Africa alone. At least half of all plantings in Africa are affected by one of these diseases. Scientists estimate that annually, 15–24 percent (equivalent to approximately 12–23 million tonnes) of the crop is lost due only to CMD in Africa.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    FAO Food Chain Crisis Early Warning Bulletin
    Forecasting threats to the food chain affecting food security in countries and regions. No. 30, January-March 2019
    2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    During the period January to March 2019, Food Chain Crisis (FCC) threats are expected to occur in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe, where they may persist within a country, spread to neighbouring countries, remain latent, or re-emerge or amplify. The dynamics and likelihood of occurrence of FCC threats depend on a number of risk factors or drivers. These include agro-ecological factors (intensive farming systems, deforestation, overgrazing, etc.), climate change (such as droughts, extreme weather events, flooding, heavy rains, heatwaves, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation - ENSO or changes in vegetation cover or water temperature), human behaviour (cultural practices, conflicts and civil insecurity, trade, etc.) and natural disasters. In relation to food security, and according to the latest Crop Prospects and Food Situation report (January- March 2019), FAO estimates that, globally, 40 countries (31 in Africa, 8 in Asia, and 1 in the Americas) are in need of external assistance for food. Persisting conflicts continue to be the dominant factor driving high levels of severe food insecurity. Weather shocks have also adversely affected food availability and access. FCC threats might compound food insecurity in fragile countries stricken by weather shocks and conflicts. Twenty-nine plant and forest pests and diseases, locusts and animal and aquatic diseases were monitored and forecasted by FAO experts for the period January-March 2019. A total of 275 forecasts were conducted in 120 countries. According to the forecasts, the following pests and diseases represent a high to moderate risk to the food chain in some countries for the period January-March 2019: Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Africa, African swine fever (ASF) in Asia and Europe, Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Avian influenza (AI) in Africa and Asia, and Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) in Africa, Asia and Europe for Animal diseases and zoonoses; Fall armyworm (FAW), Banana fusarium wilt disease (BFWD) and Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) in Africa and Asia, and Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), Wheat rust and Banana bunchy top disease (BBTD) in Africa for Plant pests and diseases; Desert Locust in Africa and Asia for Locusts; and Blue gum chalcid, Red gum lerp psyllid, Bronze bug and Polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) in Africa, Dry cone syndrome in Asia, Bark beetles in Europe and the Americas, and Pine processionary moth in Europe for Forest pests and diseases; Tilapia Lake Virus in the in the Americas and Asia, and Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Asia for Aquatic diseases.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.