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A synthesis of the formulated animal and aquafeeds industry in sub-Saharan Africa.











Moehl, J.; Halwart, M. (eds.) A synthesis of the formulated animal and aquafeeds industry in sub-Saharan Africa. CIFA Occasional Paper. No. 26. Rome, FAO. 2005. 61p.


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    Project
    Supporting Local Feed Self-Sufficiency for Inland Aquaculture in Indonesia - TCP/INS/3606 2020
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    In 2014, Indonesia produced 3.64 million tonnes of aquaculture products, making it the second largest aquaculture producer in the world. Of this production, 2.86 million tonnes, equivalent to 67 percent of total aquaculture production and 94 percent of total fish production, was accounted for by freshwater culture. The general trend towards global production intensification indicates that the demand for aquafeed will continue to rise in the coming years. Indeed, between 2008 and 2015, aquafeed demand increased by 70 percent in Indonesia. However, commercially manufactured aquafeed is estimated at 1.1 million tonnes per year and relies heavily on imported feed ingredients according to the Indonesian Feed Mill Association (GPMT). More specifically, 89 percent and 65 percent of feed ingredients for shrimp and fish aquafeed production, respectively, are being imported. Although the aquaculture production sector in Indonesia is dominated by small-scale farmers, aquaculture practices are generally driven by basic economic criteria, such as income generation, productivity and production. However, production is still largely governed by the balance between the availability and affordability of production inputs. This is certainly the case for aquafeed, which typically accounts for 50–70 percent of the costs for aquaculture production.
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    Characterization of the aquafeed sub-sector in the Kyrgyz Republic: an aquafeed value chain analysis and preparation of a business plan for establishing a feed mill 2018
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    Among many other factors, feed is a limiting factor, which accounts for a major share of the total operational cost of the aquaculture sector in Kyrgyz Republic. This study aims to analyze the value chain of aquafeed sub-sector including their possible constraints and develop a business plan for establishing small-scale aquafeed mill in the Kyrgyz Republic. This is the first post-USSR country case study which assesses the current status of the aquafeed sub-sector, aquafeed value chain, on-farm feeding and feed management practices, performance of different actors in terms of value addition and profitability, and feed regulations, institutions and policies and presents a business plan for small-scale aquafeed in Kyrgyz Republic. The study identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in this sub-sector, and suggests a number of development strategies which would improve the performance of feed industry and farmers’ access to better feeds and ultimately support the development of aquaculture sector in Kyrgyz Republic. Quantitative data analysis result shows that the Kyrgyz aquafeed sub-sector is still in its infancy and its value chain is very simple; including only few actors comprising feed input suppliers, aquafeed producers, aquafeed traders and fish farmers, and all of them are doing their business profitably. Feed is a crucial input in fish farming which accounts for about 65 – 75 percent of the operational cost of fish production, which means that a substantial part of fish farmers’ income is transferred to feed manufacturers. Good quality feed is a prerequisite for increasing aquaculture productivity in Kyrgyz Republic where particularly fish farmers are using very little volume of commercial feed as supplementary feed. With potential of aquaculture intensification and lack of quality feed, establishment of a commercial feed mill in the country for both carps and trout may have a strong justification. The primary competitors of a new feed mill would be the existing locally manufactured feeds and the commercial feed that are being imported. Imported feeds are mainly for trout and often expensive and not available in the local market throughout the country. Public-private partnership operated feed mill in Kyrgyz Republic with the capacity of 500 kg/hour is expected to be profitable, with an anticipated profit of USD13 617 in year one, rising to USD 97 980 in year five. The Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of such a mill is estimated to be 19.1 percent, which is expected to be reasonably good. Therefore, the study recommends establishing a public-private partnership aquafeed mill in Kyrgyz Republic that would be feasible, viable and profitable. The major factors impacting on the performance of the value-chain relate to the feed ingredients, feed production, fish farmers, marketing and other service providers (e.g., financial, academic and research institutions, extension services). Aquafeed value chain shows reasonable promise although there are constrains and a lack of institutional, regulatory and policy environment to oversee this sectoral development. Aquafeed subsector can play an important role in aquaculture sector development as it has strong backward and forward linkages with aquaculture sector, which can eventually play an important role in the overall development of Kyrgyz economy. The study recommends various measures to develop the sub-sector including the establishment of additional feed mills and use of locally available raw feed materials, developing and strengthening quality control and inspection facilities, providing training and better organizational management of fish farms and improving the institutional, legal and policy environment.
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    Impact of rising feed ingredient prices on aquafeeds and aquaculture production 2009
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    The present technical paper investigates and evaluates the underlying reasons for the recent dramatic rise in prices of many of the commodities (e.g., soybean, corn, fishmeal, fish oil, rice and wheat) used in aquafeed production and its consequences for the aquafeed industry, and in particular, on demand and expectations from aquaculture in securing current and future fish supplies with particular reference to Asia and Europe. This technical paper also discusses issues related to avai lability of and access to land and water resources, and the impact of other sectors, using these resources, on the direction of aquaculture both in terms of species produced and the production systems. In the light of probable increase in competition for land and water in many aquaculture producing countries in Asia, there will inevitably be increasing pressure to intensify aquaculture productivity through the use of more commercial feeds than farm-made feeds. Due to the increasing p rices of ingredients, aquafeed prices, especially the prices of compound aquafeeds, may increase further and a shortfall in the local supplies will compel importation of aquafeeds. Of the ingredients, fishmeal and fish oil are highly favoured for aquafeeds and aquafeed production is under increasing pressure due to limited supplies and increasing price of fishmeal and fish oil. Considering these factors, this review also outlines initiatives that are searching for substitutes for fishm eal and fish oil so as to position the industry to meet the challenge of securing aquafeed for sustaining aquaculture. A brief overview of coping strategies to strengthen national capacity to address the issue of aquafeed supply and to mitigate rising prices of aquafeed ingredient is given. These strategies include policies, research and private sector and farmers’ initiatives.

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