Thumbnail Image

Investing in Agriculture Environmental Services. 12-13 September 2013 FAO Headquarters, Rome. Meeting Report

Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue on Remuneration of Positive Externalities (RPE)/ Payments for Environmental Services (PES)








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Putting Payments for Environmental Services in the Context of Economic Development 2006
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Paying for the provision of environmental services is a recent policy innovation that is attracting much attention in both developed and developing countries. The innovation involves a move away from command and control environmental policies, harnessing market forces to obtain more efficient environmental outcomes. Linking payments for environmental services (PES) to economic development and poverty reduction is an issue of importance since they may represent a new source of finance to developi ng countries, and developing countries are potentially important suppliers of global environmental services. The objective of this paper is to apply economic concepts, particularly those from natural resource and environmental economics, to a wide range of issues associated with the introduction of ES programs in the context of economic development. We introduce a typology of ES based upon economic reasoning, showing that payments for ES provide a solution to externalities and public good proble ms within the bounds of political economic constraints. Secondly, we focus on the problem of who should pay for ES: to what extent are payments likely to be covered within a global framework rather within a national or regional framework? Third, we will turn to issues of program design. We present some answers to the questions of how to target payments to achieve their objectives efficiently, and what the implications of alternative design schemes are. In particular, we focus upon the equity imp lications of ES programs and how can they affect poverty alleviation. The final section addresses issues of monitoring and enforcement of ES contracts, and we summarize the key findings in the conclusion.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Investment Centre Environmental Report Series N. 1
    Kenya: Aberdares Natural Resources Development Project, Environmental Impact Assessment Report, FAO Investment Centre-African Development Bank, 1997
    1998
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    FAO Investment Centre environmental reports are directed to environment and natural resources specialists. They address environmental issues associated with the formulation of investment projects for the agricultural/rural sector. This report describes an environmental assessment that contributed to improvements in the project design for the Aberdares Natural Resources Development Project in Kenya. The objective of this six-year project was to conserve and develop the natural resources of the Ab erdares region based on an integrated management approach involving local communities. Project preparation was done by the FAO Investment Centre in 1995 and appraisal took place in 1997 in parallel with the preparation of the environmental assessment by a multi-disciplinary team led by Centre staff. The major project investment consisted of the construction of some 360-km of fencing that would encircle the entire Aberdares park perimeter with the aim of reducing human-wildlife conflicts. The tea m examined three project scenarios: without project, with project and modified project. One of the key conclusions of the team was that as proposed the fence was not viable; a conclusion based on both economic and environmental considerations. Rather, replacing the fence with a mixed barrier and non-barrier system (e.g. game moats and topographic barriers) would improve the project. In addition, the mission recommended the completion of a comprehensive management plan prior to initiating any inv estment activities. The recommendations were accepted by the African Development Bank and the Government of Kenya and contributed to significant improvements in project design.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidelines for Establishing Audits of Agricultural–Environmental Hotspots 2003
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Starting in 1999, the Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information and Mapping Systems (FIVIMS) Secretariat in FAO has published an annual report on global Food Insecurity and Vulnerability (see: http://www.fao.org/DOCREP/005/Y7352E/Y7352E00.HTM). The report, - The State of World Food Insecurity, known as SOFI - assembles, analyses and disseminates information on who are the food insecure, where they are located, and why they are food insecure, nutritionally vulnerable or at risk. The Environme nt and Natural Resources Service (SDRN) of the Sustainable Development Department, FAO, has been involved through the preparation of maps and analyses. As food insecurity can often be correlated with difficulties in making proper use of natural resources, it was considered that it would be useful to produce regular analyses about areas where ecological processes or agricultural production are disrupted due to conflicts between environment and agriculture. Such areas are termed agricultural-envir onmental hotspots, or Ag-En hotspots. The emphasis is thus on non-optimal functioning of ecosystems, agriculture, or both. "Environment" includes natural, social, economic and cultural aspects. A brainstorming meeting was organized on 9-10 December 2002 in FAO headquarters to define Ag-En hotspot products that could be prepared based on data availability and on demand, with internal (FAO) and external partners. A discussion paper was prepared in advance by Michael Glantz, Senior Scientist in t he Environmental and Societal Impacts Group at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. Based on the discussions held at the meeting, Dr Glantz revised the discussion paper, which is presented here as Guidelines for Establishing Audits of Agricultural-Environmental (Ag-En) Hotspots. The report serves multiple objectives, starting with terminology and delineation of concepts.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.