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Poster: Benefit of pulses for nutrition










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Zambia Nutrition Education - Grade 4 - Teacher's Book 2007
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    These education materials are intended to help tackle the widespread problem of malnutrition among Zambian school children. They are based on the basic school classroom curriculum for nutrition education as identified by teachers, heads teachers, local nutritionists and education standards officers. The geographical area targeted was Luapula but most of the issues apply equally to other Zambian provinces. Many school-age children in Zambia suffer from malnutrition. Particularly common pro blems are protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), vitamin A deficiency and iron deficiency. Children with these deficiencies are stunted (small for their age), do not grow well, are vulnerable to disease, are often listless and inattentive and do not do well at school. They may also have other more specific health problems, such as poor eyesight and anaemia. The reason for these dietary deficiencies may be that children do not get enough to eat, but even more that their diet does not give them the variety of foods they need. Another problem is that many schoolchildren do not eat frequently enough. Children need to eat often to maintain their energy levels, yet even when food is available in the home, many children go to school without breakfast; some eat only one meal a day1. This has a detrimental effect on their learning as well as on their long-term growth and health. These nutritional conditions are aggravated by other health problems. Widespread diarrhoeal diseases contri bute to malnutrition and put lives at risk; these infections (and others) are spread by poor personal and environmental hygiene and sanitation. Malaria, like other serious diseases, causes loss of appetite, weakens the body and can lead to protein-energy malnutrition. Malaria is also one of the major causes of anaemia in malaria-endemic areas such as Luapula. Prevention and correct treatment of these diseases can therefore improve nutritional wellbeing considerably.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    World Pulses Day 2021
    Pulses for sustainable food systems and healthy diets - 12 February 2021
    2021
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    Pulses, and legume species in general, contribute to the sustainability of food systems and function as one of the main drivers to enable healthy diets. These species are the basis for diversification and improving sustainability of agricultural production systems. Pulses are particularly important to sustainable crop production due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen and some improve the turnover of phosphorous; therefore, pulses play a significant role in optimizing the use of fertilizer and have positive impact on the environment. In addition, pulses are a good source of plant-based protein as well as dietary fibre, vitamins (e.g. B vitamins) and minerals such as iron, potassium, magnesium and zinc. Pulses have higher levels of protein, dietary fibre and minerals than all major cereals. As a plant-based source of proteins, pulses are particularly important because the amino acids contained in pulses complement the amino acids found in staple cereals. Likewise, pulses can be key to increasing the resilience of farming systems to changing climate. In this regard, including pulses in multiple cropping systems (e.g. agroforestry, intercropping systems) can help to increase resilience of agroecosystems and improve productivity. Furthermore, on the economic side, International pulses trade proves to be a positive driver in ensuring the resilience of regional and global supply chains, and a critical tool to facilitate access to healthy and nutritious products, allowing consumers to expand healthy diet options and contributing to the sustainable use of natural resources.
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    Project
    Support to Malnutrition Reduciton in Women and Vulnerable Populations through Food-Based Approaches - TCP/GHA/3703 2023
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    In 2019 it was estimated that 5 5 million people in Ghana were malnourished Levels of malnutrition are particularly concerning among children, and are an underlying cause of a third of all child deaths With a national prevalence of stunting at 19 percent (as per the Ghana Demographic and Health Survey 2014 the situation is worrying, especially in the Eastern and Central regions, where anaemia is also prevalent Malnutrition in Ghana is mostly caused by inadequate food intake and a lack of both variety and nutrient rich food in the diet of the population Poor residents in rural areas are particularly vulnerable Although Ghana possesses a diverse range of nutrient rich crops, consumption and utilization of these items are low, due in part to supply chain challenges, socio economic factors and a lack of knowledge and awareness on how to preserve and use nutrient rich food This FAO project seeks to address the challenge of nutritious food consumption in Central, Eastern and Greater Accra regions by promoting the production and consumption of nutrient rich food such as the orange fleshed sweet potato ( and other locally identified crops The OFSP was identified as a key crop for this project, as it contains a high concentration of carotene, which has the potential to improve the nutrition of women, children and other vulnerable groups Its high iron content also makes it effective in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia.

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