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A Survey Report to Follow-Up

The development of the concept of minimum data requirements for establishing maximum residue limits (MRLs) including import tolerances for pesticides











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    Document
    Implications of Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) on tea trade 2015
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    A major achievement of the Intergovernmental Group on Tea (IGG/Tea) is its submission to, and acceptance by, CODEX Alimentarius of a list of priority chemicals detailing the correlation between field trial protocol and good laboratory practices (GLP) supervised protocol. The Working Group (WG) on Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) produced a document explaining how the submission could facilitate the achievement of global harmonization of MRLs, including the communication plan and the Decision Tree f or discussion and endorsement by the Group. Document CCP:TE 14/3 was written by the Secretariat to complement the effort of the WG by examining the implication of MRL harmonization on international trade patterns of tea. Food safety standards have different effects on consumption and trade flows. Primarily they aim to maintain consumer safety through defined sets of limits and regulations, but these regulations could have a trade deterring effect when exporters cannot comply with the standards. As one of the food safety standards, MRLs set maximum levels of pesticide residue that can be traced in food and food products to ensure food safety. CODEX Alimentarius (2011) defines CODEX maximum limit for pesticide residues as “the maximum concentration of a pesticide residue (expressed as mg/kg), recommended by the CODEX Alimentarius Commission to be legally permitted in or on food commodities and animal feeds. MRLs are based on good agriculture practice (GAP) data, and foods derived from co mmodities that comply with the respective MRLs are intended to be toxicologically acceptable”.
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    Book (series)
    Carryover in feed and transfer from feed to food of unavoidable and unintended residues of approved veterinary drugs
    Report of the Joint FAO/WHO expert meeting – 8–10 January 2019, FAO Headquarters, Rome, Italy
    2019
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    Carryover of veterinary drugs in feed can occur during feed processing, handling, transportation, delivery or in feeding animals on-farm. The risk of unavoidable and unintentional veterinary drug residues from feed carryover and/or transfer from feed to food of animal origin is unacceptable when it causes adverse health effects in target and/or non-target animals and/or humans consuming food originating from these animals. If carryover is not properly managed, contaminated feed can directly harm species that are sensitive to the unintended veterinary drug they consume, and /or can result in residues in food of animal origin such as meat, milk and eggs that render them unsafe for human consumption. Even if residues are not a safety hazard, they can pose regulatory and global trade issue as countries/markets may enforce a “zero” tolerance for residues when appropriate maximum residue limits have not been established. Upon request of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods (CCRVDF), FAO and WHO convened an Expert Meeting to review the causes of veterinary drug carryover in animal feed and the transfer from feed to food, as well as the known risks to human health and international trade, and suggest appropriate risk management strategies. This report shows the results of the expert discussions, conclusions and recommendations.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Residue Evaluation of Certain Veterinary Drugs. Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). 70th meeting, 2008. FAO JECFA Monographs 6 2009
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    This document contains monographs on residue evaluations of certain veterinary drugs, prepared at the seventieh meeting of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), which was held in Geneva, Switzerland from 21 to 29 October 2008. Three substances were evaluated for the first time for the animal species concerned, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Four substances were reassessed, dexamethasone, tilmicosin, triclabendazole and tylosin. The residue monographs provide informatio n on chemical identity and properties of the compounds, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, residue depletion studies and analytical methods validated and used for the detection and quantification of the compounds. In addition to these monographs, this document includes the considerations and recommendations developed by the Committee for residues of veterinary drugs in honey and possible approaches to derive MRLs for this commodity; and a monograph on residues in aquatic species of and an estimata tion of human dietary exposure to malachite green (an antimicrobial agent and contamimant). This publication and other documents produced by JECFA contain information that is useful to those who work with or are involved with recommending or controlling maximum residue limits for veterinary drugs in foods.

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