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Measuring Forest Degradation







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    Document
    Assessing forest degradation
    Towards the development of globally applicable guidelines
    2011
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    The preparation of “Assessing forest degradation – towards the development of globally applicable guidelines” represents a joint effort of the Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF) undertaken under the umbrella of the 2010 Global Forest Resources Assessment (FAO,2010). FAO gratefully acknowledges the financial and in-kind contributions to this work made by CPF partners. Thanks go to all who have contributed to the development of this work: to those who provided answers to the initial qu estionnaires, to the authors of the 20 case studies, and to the authors and experts who contributed to technical meetings. A special thanks go to the authors of the chapters that describe key criteria for measuring forest degradation and to Victoria Heymell who saw the task through many arduous steps. Thanks also go to Mette Løyche Wilkie, Emma Foti, Marisalee Palermo and the rest of the FRA team in FAO for providing advice, guidance and assistance along the way and to Alastair Sarre who did the final editing.
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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the project “Sustainable forest management under the authority of Cameroonian Councils”
    Project code: GCP/CMR/033/GFF - GEF ID: 4800
    2023
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    Project "Sustainable forest management under the authority of Cameroonian councils" (GCP/CMR/033/GFF; GEF ID: 4800) was financed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and implemented by the FAO along with the Ministry of Forests and Wildlife (MINFOF) the Ministry of Environment, Nature Protection and Sustainable Development (MINEPDED), and the Association of Forest Communes of Cameroon (ACFCAM) as well as other national partners as executing agencies. The final evaluation found the project was highly relevant to the needs of national governments and of Cameroonian councils, the FAO, and GEF despite gender and indigenous peoples’ issues not being prioritized. Significant capacity building of local council officials, Peasant Forest Committees (PFCs) and Council Forest Cells (CFCs) were achieved on sustainable forest management issues and carbon management. However, due to significant delays, internal governance conflicts and personal issues within the FAO and between national government partners and executing agencies, the landmark paradigmatic change in forest management approach, whereby council forest management plans would integrate sustainable forest management, biodiversity conservation and carbon management components have not been achieved. Project gains are likely to continue beyond the project but this is contingent on actions taken to address financial, institutional, social and environmental risks.
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    Book (series)
    Zero-deforestation commitments: A new avenue towards enhanced forest governance?
    Forestry Working Paper 3
    2018
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    The zero-deforestation movement has gained considerable momentum as governments and companies enter into commitments to curb deforestation. The most innovative are multi-stakeholder initiatives, where governments and international organi- zations have joined with the private sector and civil society organizations in making commit- ments to reduce deforestation. These pledges have created opportunities for improved forest governance by envisaging the private sector at the centre of the movement. They have also encouraged a broader understanding of the drivers and and consequences of deforestation, and how these can be more realistically addressed.

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