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SMALL-SCALE SEED ENTERPRISE

Start-up and Management








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    Afghanistan and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
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    Afghanistan became of member of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 1949. With some of the world’s highest levels of under nutrition and poverty, the Afghan government has focused national efforts on improving the livelihoods for all sections of the rural community based upon economically viable activities – food production, off-farm employment and trade. FAO in Afghanistan supports the rehabilitation and development of the agricultural sector and assists the country towards becoming food secure and self-reliant. Specifically, FAO seeks to: a) assist vulnerable farmers resume their livelihoods; b) improve food security and nutrition; c) ensure sustainable management of natural resources; d) promote sustainable agriculture and rural development; e) contribute to the generation of viable alternative livelihoods; and f ) build capacity in the agricultural sector at national and local levels. The Organization plays a leading role in the UN’s coordination of assistance to agricul ture in emergency and rehabilitation situations. FAO is the co-chair of the food security and agriculture cluster, and the FAO Emergency and Rehabilitation Unit (ERU) seeks to initiate agricultural rehabilitation and prepare the pathway towards development. Donors to FAO’s programme in Afghanistan include Belgium, the European Commission, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States, UN Mission, MDG-Spain and the government of Afghani stan through loans and grant from World Bank and IFAD. FAO has also contributed resources for the development of agriculture in Afghanistan from its own resources under the Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP). Three areas of cooperation are highlighted in this publication: the rehabilitation of irrigation infrastructure, improved seed production and distribution, and increased production of dairy products including milk and eggs.
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    Evaluation of Seed Enterprise Enhancement and Development, GCP/SIL/032/GER
    Final Evaluation Report
    2013
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    ‘Seed Enterprise Enhancement and Development” GCP/SIL/032/GER was a three year project (initial EOD – NTE Jan 2009 – Jan 2012; extended to December 2012) with a budget of USD 2.2 million. The project followed the Evaluation of GCP/SIL/023/GER the “Development of a Sustainable Seed Programme in Sierra Leone”4. This evaluation concluded that there was improved coordination in the seed sector, an increased capacity for seed production, and production and dissemination of seed. However, after many y ears of external assistance from the Government of Germany and in line with the commercialization strategy of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security (MAFFS) there was an urgent need for the transformation of the Seed Multiplication Unit (SMU)5 in a business entity to make it more market and profit oriented and to change its corporate structure through a suitable privatization arrangement such as a public-private-partnership seed enterprise.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Small-scale forest enterprise development in Nepal: overview, issues and challenges 2018
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    The study looks at three representative cases in detail to understand the organizational management; resource governance, production and harvesting; technology and financing; and benefit sharing arrangements. It is found that the SSFE governance framework is still evolving particularly in case of those managed by groups. Forest resources are generally harvested under an approved management plan and the user groups have adopted measures to ensure sustained supply of resources over time. Despite these measures, there are sustainability challenges that these SSFEs will face in the long run. While most of the SSFEs are struggling to generate profit, they have a strong orientation for equitable benefit sharing, especially to benefit poor, women and other marginalized forest dependent groups. The study has made a few recommendations. First, it shows a need to explore suitable institutional arrangements that creates adequate incentive to local forest user group leaders to run enterprises and develop needed partnership with private sector. Second, capacity development of service providers, entrepreneurs and forest managers should be supported by suitable technical and managerial capacities. Third, there is a need for timely and periodic revision in policy and forest tenure to incentivize forest managing communities and private actors in establishing SSFEs. Fourth, critically needed business development services should be provided through a combination of public and private funds and mechanism. Finally, the government must ensure a safe and fair business environment in which entrepreneurs are encouraged to invest more on SSFEs.

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