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Propeller Nozzles for Trawlers, India. Technical report, based on the work of A. Kohane

FI:TCP/IND/005, Technical Report










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    Book (series)
    Fishing vessel energy audit pilot project: a pilot project to audit commercial shrimp trawlers in Thailand
    Phase I
    2017
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    This document describes the first known attempt to conduct a formal energy audit in a trawl fishery in Thailand, and is the result of collaboration between the FAO, the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC), and the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI). The overall goal of this project was to contribute to greater economic performance of the fishing fleet, improve resilience and livelihoods of fishermen and their families, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. For the first time in a Thai trawl fishery, an energy audit was applied to the single-boat trawl fleet. The audit consisted of two levels. The Level 1 audit consisted of a detailed questionnaire of fishermen in the single-boat trawl fleet and the Level 2 audit consisted of at-sea measurement of fuel consumption of trawlers under a variety of commercial operating conditions. A total of 94 fishermen were audited as part of the questionnaire. Considerable variation was found in the fishing fleet, including vessel age, service speed, propeller size, and engine maintenance schedules. The consumption of fuel was the dominant operational expense for each size category of trawler, being an order of magnitude greater than the other categories, followed by crew wages and then food. Responses by fishermen suggested highly diversified and personalized fishing activity, although some responses appeared to suggest inaccurate recall of their major fishing costs. Six trawlers were selected for at-sea measurement of fuel consumption over a 10-day fishing trip.
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    Boatbuilding Materials for Small-Scale Fisheries in India - BOBP/WP/9 1980
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    This paper summaries a study on the availability and prices of materials used to construct the hulls of fishing craft for the important small-scale fisheries of the East Coast of India. The paper should be of interest to development planners, legislators and administrators. Builders of fishing craft, suppliers of materials, and owners and prospective owners of fishing craft may also find useful the information on trends in prices and availability of boatbuilding materials and the possibilities o f alternative materials. The study covered the following boatbuilding materials: timber for kattumarams and boats; fibre-reinforced plastics; ferrocement; steel; and aluminium, which is used forsheathing wooden hulls and is also a construction material in its own right. The study was carried out by Matsyasagar Consultancy Services Private Limited under contract to the Programme for the Development of Small-Scale Fisheries in the Bay of Bengal, GCP/RAS/040/SWE (usually abbreviated to th e Bay of Bengal Programme). The Programme is executed by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) and funded by the Swedish International Development Authority (SIDA). The main aims of the Bay of Bengal Programme are to develop and demonstrate technologies by which the conditions of small-scale fishermen and the supply of fish from the small-scale sector may be improved, in five of the countries bordering the Bay of Bengal — Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka an d Thailand.
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    Book (series)
    Fishing boat designs: 2. V-bottom boats of planked and plywood construction (Rev.2) 2004
    Timber remains the most common material for the construction of boats under 15 metres in length. There has been a change towards fibre-reinforced plastic in most developed countries and some developing countries but, in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, probably more than 90 percent of small fishing vessels are built of wood. The cost advantage of timber versus other materials is still sufficient to ensure that it will remain the dominant boatbuilding material for a long time to come in developing c ountries. However, unrestricted or illicit access to forest resources and the introduction of rational forestry management policies have caused and will continue to cause a scarcity of the sections of timbers traditionally favoured by boatbuilders. The resultant scarcity and high cost of good quality timber have not meant that less wooden boats are being built, but rather that vessel quality has deteriorated through the use of inferior timber and inadequate design strength. This updated and completely revised publication supersedes Revision 1 of FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 134 published in 1997. It follows an exhaustive study on structural timber design applied to wooden boat construction. The publication includes the designs of four small fishing vessels (from 5.2 to 8.5 metres), with comprehensive material specifications and lists, and provides detailed instructions for their construction, both planked and of plywood. The designs are appropriate for inshore and coastal fisheri es and emphasis has been placed on relative ease of construction and minimum wastage of timber.

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