Thumbnail Image

Enabling Smallholder Access to Finance in United Republic of Tanzania - TCP/URT/3501









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Improve the Competitiveness and Increase Post-Harvest Value Chain of Smallholder Farmers - TCP/URT/3604 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The United Republic of Tanzania is a low-income rural economy, with most citizens participating in agriculture for household income generation. Agriculture represents about 23 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) and 30 percent of export earnings, and employs 66.9 percent of the working population. In 2000/01 agriculture accounted for 31 percent of GDP but has since fallen to 23 percent despite an annual GDP growth rate of 5-6 percent. The poor performance of the sector is caused by several factors, including poor extension services, financial illiteracy and inadequate access to financial services by smallholder farmers. In collaboration with MoA, the project aimed to address these challenges by improving the competitiveness and enhancing the post-harvest management capacity of VC (smallholder farmers and processors), building the management capacity of producers’ organizations, creating sustainable linkages with other agricultural VC actors, and improving post-harvest practices to enhance farmers’ competitiveness. The project also built linkages between farmer organizations (FOs) and other service providers, encouraging the development of a long-term market strategy and contributing to the national objective to increase agricultural productivity and reduce rural poverty. The project was further expected to increase and stabilize the incomes of smallholder farmers producing paddy in Iringa district, building capacity in post-harvest handling and strengthening the commercial relationships between FOs and other rice VC actors. Market linkages between producer and other value chain actors such as traders and processors were established by the project, with 15 new linkages being forged.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Ten years of FAO experience on ending child labour in agriculture in Africa
    A compendium of practices from Malawi, Mali, the Niger, the United Republic of Tanzania and Uganda
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This compendium is the result of a first-of-its-kind stocktaking exercise looking at FAO activities to address child labour in agriculture in Malawi, Mali, Uganda, the Niger and the United Republic of Tanzania over a decade (2010–2020). It is intended to make a practical contribution to the field of child labour elimination in agriculture, by shedding a light on some of the FAO-supported activities, country processes and practices as well as achievements, and lessons learned. As such, it highlights the general main lessons learned and key messages, outlines and provide details on country processes and related outcomes and achievements on knowledge generation, capacity development, awareness raising, policy advice and promotion of advocacy and partnerships. The contents on these FAO strategies for the elimination of child labour in agriculture are complemented by examples of areas of work such as promoting safe practices and labour-saving technologies and empowering and building the skills of youth aged 15–17 by facilitating school-to-work transition in agriculture.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Good agricultural practices (GAP)
    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)
    2023
    Also available in:

    Chickpeas are vital for food security, nutrition, and farmer income in Myanmar's Central Dry Zone (CDZ), ranking second in South Asia after India. Collaborative research efforts of the Department of Agriculture Reform and the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (DAR-ICRISAT) have contributed to an eightfold increase in crop yield due to the introduction of more efficient varieties of chickpea in the country. Good agricultural practices (GAP) and value chain promotion of chickpea have significant potential which can further boost productivity and increase exports. The upgraded GAP standards of chickpea are inclusive of food safety, produce quality, worker health and safety, and environmental management aspects, as they were developed in a context-specific and participatory manner encompassing validation from farmers about the existing constraints in application of GAP. Dissemination and improved application of chickpea GAP is planned to be achieved through a comprehensive capacity-building programme of chickpea smallholder farmers, public–private partners, and value chain actors, at pre- and post-harvest levels. Strengthening lead farmers and crop producers’ organizations through technical support, improved demonstration and market linkages will leverage the objectives of GAP adoption and upscaling in the target regions. On-farm demonstrations, farmer field schools (FFS), training, and information and communications technology (ICT) tools will supplement GAP promotional interventions. User-friendly integrated pest management (IPM) handbooks and FFS curricula support farmers and existing GAP initiatives will foster the approach of climate-smart good agricultural practices at farmers' field level and will ensure the sustainability of farmers' income through increased productivity, product market competence and produce quality.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.