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The United Nations (UN) Common Guidance on Resilience for Humanitarian-Development-Peace Actors

Webinar - 22 October 2019











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    Presentation
    The UN Common Guidance on Resilience for Humanitarian-Development-Peace Actors
    Webinar Powerpoint
    2019
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    The Preparedness and Resilience Working Group (PRWG) aims to guide and support in-country Food Security Cluster (gFSC) on necessary preparedness and resilience-building activities to contribute to bridge the Humanitarian-Development-Peace Nexus, as strengthening the resilience of vulnerable households, communities and systems is central to achieving food security and improving nutrition in the face of shocks and stressors. Efforts to strengthen resilience, understood as the ability of a system to anticipate, resist, absorb, accommodate and recover from the effects of a hazard, should primarily target those who are food insecure or at risk of becoming so. In most cases, this means individuals and groups living in extreme poverty or close to the poverty line in rural areas, as well as those living in fragile environments where conflict, natural disasters or other major events can disrupt food systems or impede access to adequate and nutritious food for at least part of the population. Over the past decade, strengthening resilience has emerged as an important means to prevent, mitigate and prepare for risks associated with a range of threats to development. To strengthen coherence in UN resilience-building efforts at the regional, country and local levels, the Chief Executive Board (CEB) of the UN decided that a UN resilience framework was needed, covering all types of hazards and risks and promoting greater horizontal collaboration and joined-up efforts across the UN System and partners.
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    Booklet
    Deploying a humanitarian-development-peace nexus approach: Exploring, strengthening and reviving dryland ecosystems 2021
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    The FAO-CARE- CGIAR joint technical working paper will contribute to developing an FAO position and improved understanding of the links between, and risks of, climate change and various kinds of conflict as related to FAO’s mandate, with particular attention to crisis contexts in dryland forests and agrosilvopastoral areas. More broadly, this will feed into UN system-level discussion and processes related to the multidimensional nature of Climate Security. The working paper will unpack how combined climate shocks, environmental degradation, and conflict exacerbate people’s vulnerability and reflect how responses should adapt to tackle these compounding challenges and bolster resilience. The joint study will gather and analyse examples of strategies and interventions that help communities identify and mitigate combined climate, environmental and conflict risks. The paper will then draw lessons learned and recommendations for design and implement projects that support people in achieving long term food security or in building up their ability to cope with multiple shocks, including those of climate change and conflict. The joint study will be based on the premise that humanitarian, development and peace efforts are complementary and mutually-reinforcing and provide evidence that integrated responses offer the most effective way to tackle the root causes of people's vulnerability in crises contexts. It will target donors, policy-makers and practitioners from different disciplines.
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    Document
    Cuba - Plan Of Action. Response to needs arising from Hurricane Sandy - November 2012 2013
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    Hurricane Sandy hit the eastern region of Cuba hard. It passed through the country on 25 October, 2012 as a category 2 Hurricane (approaching category 3) in a five hours span. Sustained winds reached 200 km/h as Sandy lashed Cuba´s second and third most populated provinces of Santiago de Cuba and Holguin, respectively. 340,000 people were evacuated as a preventative measure, of whom 300,000 stayed with relatives. With the exception of 1,000 people accommodated in collective centres, these people have now returned to their damaged homes. Despite these preparedness measures, 11 people died and some three million people (27% of the country's inhabitants) are indirectly affected. At least half of these have had their housing, water, and food directly affected. Half of this population is female. More than 226,600 homes were damaged (representing 50% of the inhabitants of the eastern region) and at least 17,000 were destroyed - the majority in the City of Santiago de Cuba, with a population of close to 500,000 people. Although the Government of Cuba is responding swiftly and effectively to the hurricane, additional response is needed. The United Nations System, in support of the initial response of the Government, is working closely with local authorities, donors and emergency organizations to support national efforts. UN agencies mobilized $1.5 million in emergency funds, which was complemented by a $1.6 million allocation from the Central Emergency Response Fund from the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). The urban context of the affected area, with significant losses in housing, food reserves, crops, and storage and production facilities, combined with Santiago de Cuba´s importance as an economic hub for the eastern region and the country, has strained response capacity and leaves a huge impact on the living conditions of affected people. Given the magnitude of the storm and the resulting devastation, those affected ne ed urgent support to maintain basic health and nutritional standards and to provide adequate shelter/housing conditions. Of particular concern are heightened needs of vulnerable groups, such as women, pregnant women, children under five, as well as elderly people over 65. Immediate assistance is intended to address basic needs, and support start-up of recovery activities, while reducing vulnerabilities by strengthening communities’ resilience to future extreme weather. Food security is of pr iority given the magnitude of the losses of food combined with damage to food storage facilities. In addition to large losses in agriculture crops in the eastern region hit directly by the hurricane, subsequent flooding in the central regions compounds food losses. There is also an urgent need to restore health care services including repair of structures, replacement of medical equipment and restocking of medicines such as antibiotics and supplies. It must be assured that vaccination serv ices are resumed, early warning surveillance, prevention and treatment of potential disease outbreak, provision of maternal health services and sexual and reproductive health are in place. The immediate return of students and teachers to classes requires emergency repairs to damaged schools and replacement of school materials, interventions to provide potable water and sanitation, and construction material to repair roofs. This Plan of Action is seeking $30.6 million to address the urgent needs of the population affected by Hurricane Sandy.1 The UNS developed this plan recognizing the priorities of the affected population and was discussed with the Government. The UNS also held discussions with the Red Cross and international NGOs to avoid duplication of efforts. All projects and activities in the Plan of Action have humanitarian aspects that will be implemented during the first six months. Due to the particularities of the impact of this disaster and its urban context, many projects will continue until 18 months, strengthening the transition recovery. This strategy will cover basic immediate needs as well as support the improvement of living conditions of affected people.

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