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¿Pueden los pequeños agricultores no sólo sobrevivir, sino prosperar o bien desempeñar una función decisiva en la reducción de la pobreza generalizada?







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    Food insecurity, poverty and agriculture: A concept paper 2002
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    This paper argues for a twin-track approach to hunger and poverty reduction that combines measures to promote rural development through growth in agriculture and rural off-farm activities with measures to provide direct and immediate access to food for the most needy. The paper begins with an exposition of the concepts of food insecurity and poverty and shows that the majority of the hungry and poor in developing countries still live in rural areas. It then documents the substantial economic costs of hunger to show that direct action against hunger can itself contribute to poverty reduction. It goes on to argue that if the income from agricultural growth is spent locally and promotes growth in rural off-farm activities, this can have a strong impact on the incomes of the poor. Evidence is presented to substantiate this argument. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of the twin-track approach for anti poverty strategies.
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    Rural development and the future of small-scale family farms 2015
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    Renewed attention has recently been given to the importance (and the position) of small-scale family farms through the International Year of Family Farms (IYFF). However, public policies are deficient, investments are lacking, and many of the 500 million smallholder farmers receive little to no support. Standard typologies that distinguish “commercial farmers”, “part-time farmers” (in transition, and on their way out) and “subsistence farmers” miss the point of the complexity of farming liveliho ods, in which particularly the large group of latter category is actually active in various markets. Influential policy perspectives focus on the insertion of small-scale family farmers in (global) value chains as an important way to promote rural development, and consequently reducing rural poverty. This study argues that such “one-size-fits-all” approach should be looked at critically, as the results have been mixed, at best. Although the integration of smallholders into global value chains i s promoted to enhance their competitiveness and market access, these value chains may not actually engage many of these rural producers, and may end up being exclusionary. A broader approach is needed to also address inequalities in land rights and empower poor rural people through strengthening their organizations and meeting the calls for the promotion of inclusive and sustainable rural development processes through renewed forms of collaboration between the State, the market and civil society , and in particular by promoting rural poverty reduction through broader rural territorial development.
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    Cambio en el uso de la tierra, absorción de carbono y mitigación de la pobreza 2003
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    Land use change is a key requirement for improving rural incomes and making a significant reduction in poverty levels globally. Over 70% of the world’s poor are located in rural areas, with land use as a major source of subsistence. Improving the productivity of their land use systems is essential for increasing incomes and food security among them. Land use change is also a relatively low cost and rapidly implementable means of climate change mitigation. To the extent that the land use cha nges required for poverty alleviation coincide with that required for carbon sequestration, significant synergies can be harnessed in meeting both objectives. Estimates of predicted supply costs and demand prices indicate that several types of land use change appropriate for small and low income landusers will be a competitive source of emission reduction credits, although again there is considerable uncertainty in the final form of the market. However, even where there is significant potential for sequestration payments to contribute to poverty alleviation, considerable effort will be required to move from the objectives to the reality. In some cases this may be made through the structure of carbon sequestration payment programs, to address the investment and insurance needs of poor producers and provide adequate incentives for participation. In other cases larger institutional and policy reforms may be necessary in order to create the conditions necessary for poor landusers to be nefit from carbon sequestration payments.

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