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Effects of land use and land use change on soil properties in northeast rainforest landscapes of Madagascar

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Assessment of aboveground carbon in a humid forest of Madagascar for better forest management at a local scale
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Carbon quantification in tropical forests is vital for the successful implementation of climate mitigation activities including Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) and for a better action plan for ecosystem management. Despite several studies in the aboveground carbon of Madagascar forests, studies at the local level are rare. This study, therefore, aims to assess the aboveground biomass (AGB) at the local level in Ankeniheny-Zahamena Forest Corridor (CAZ). Here, local allometric equations were developed to estimate AGB based from the destructive harvest of 54 trees. These equations are then applied to the 1800 trees inventoried in 28 study sites spread over four zones. Thereafter, the influence of climatic (temperature and precipitation) and topographical factors (altitude and slope) on the variability of AGB was analyzed. Hence, the sites were classified according to these two factors via hierachical ascending classification (HAC). Then, the effect of the two factors on the AGB was appreciated by analysis of the variances (ANOVA). The present study estimated aboveground carbon stock varying from 119, 55 ± 24, 11 Mg. ha - 1 to 176, 57 ± 51,91Mg. ha1 considering local equation EqCAZ3. The variability between AGB per zone were observed. The classification showed three bioclimatic classes. Then, climatic and topographic factors have significant effects at p-value 0, 05 on AGB. Furthermore, a significant contribution of biomass in DBH class ≥10cm (p-value <0,001) suggested the importance of growing and mature trees in carbon storage. Thus, the interest of this study was linked in improving and updating the quantification of the AGB in CAZ. These data are crucial to support the activities related to REDD + and to fight against degradation and deforestation. Priority of conservation and protection mainly in the area of Anjahamana by its favorable bioclimatic conditions was recommended. Keywords: aboveground biomass, allometric equation, degradation and deforestation, tropical rainforest, Madagascar ID: 3486668
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    Soil organic carbon and nutrient availability under Populus deltoides based agroforestry system in semi-arid region of North-West India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    To achieve biological production on a sustainable basis through the addition of soil organic carbon (SOC) and check land degradation, Populus deltoides is a promising species recognized as an important tree component in agroforestry system (AFS) in the present changing climate. The soil is enriched through the addition of leaf litter in large quantities by this tree, which ultimately improves the fertility in terms of SOC, available N, P and K. However, scanty information is obtainable related to associations between soil properties and poplar based AFS. In this communication, the objective of this study to examine the effect of three old poplar based AFS on soil OC, available N, P and K. The site consisted of six different spacings: i.e. 3×3m, 4×3m, 5×3m, 6×3m, 7×3m and 8×3m of poplar were intercropped with winter wheat, and in adjacent agricultural control plot, where winter wheat was the sole crop (devoid of tree). We quantified soil properties such as soil SOC and available N, P and K at 0-15 cm depth and studied their spatial variability in relation to different spacings of poplar based AFS during 2018-2019. SOC accumulation rates increased with the decrease in tree spacing and were maximum (0.69%) under 3×3 m spacing. The available soil N, P and K increased significantly under different spacings of poplar based AFS in all the treatments from their initial values. The highest available soil N (233.5 kg ha –1 ), P (16.1 kg ha–1) and K (285.3 kg ha–1) were recorded under 3 × 3m spacing compared to 4×3m, 5×3m, 6×3m, 7×3m, 8×3m and sole cropping after harvesting of wheat crop. Keywords: Climate change, Adaptive and integrated management, Research, Agriculture, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3486112
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    The farmer with agroforestry practices might be the “next forester”?
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The main tropical Agro-Forestry Systems (AFS) are often complex, multi-stage and multi-species. Apart from home gardens intended for self-consumption, AFS are often based on a main crop with economic, or export value: rubber, coconut, cocoa, coffee, cloves, vanilla, damar, durian... with also local fruit trees, fast-growing fuelwood trees and timber trees for self-consumption or sale. This diversification in AFS focused on industrial crops, often comes after a period of deforestation since the end of the 19th century during the period of the colonial empires. Wood can also come from species used for services such as providing shade for coffee or cocoa trees. Wood species are also common in the local forest (Indonesia/Thailand), reflecting farmers' strategy of conserving local resources. In other cases, native species have almost entirely disappeared (e.g. clove AFS on the East Coast of Madagascar) in favor of introduced species. Sometime, the main crop is also a timber specie such a rubber (used for furniture), Durian, Litchi... Now that most forests have almost disappeared in central plains with easy access in Southeast Asia (with potential commercial value), timber from AFS is becoming a real challenge that depends mainly on tree tenure and local regulation. Today, the current demand for tropical wood has decreased considerably since the golden age of deforestation (1980/2010) due to resource depletion and a global demand towards products from dedicated plantations from Europe or elsewhere. The market has changed from a massive use of tropical timber for multiple purposes to a limited use for specific purposes. In this context, timber in AFS, often produced at marginal cost, can be an alternative to produce valuable timber. We consider in this sense that the farmer in tropical regions with agroforestry practices might be the “forester of the future”. Beside, AFS with timber might significantly contribute to positive externalities and eco- systemic services for a better sustainability. Keywords: agroforestry, forester, timber, diversification. ID 3639413

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