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Food Aid as Part of a Coherent Strategy to Advance Food Security Objectives








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    Booklet
    Achieving SDG 2 without breaching the 1.5 °C threshold: A global roadmap, Part 1
    How agrifood systems transformation through accelerated climate actions will help achieving food security and nutrition, today and tomorrow, In brief
    2023
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    In 2022, 738.9 million people faced hunger, nearly 2.4 billion in 2022 lacked regular access to adequate food, and over 3.1 billion could not afford healthy diets. The pandemic added 120 million to the number of the chronically undernourished. In 2030, an estimated 590.3 million will suffer hunger. The planet faces crises, exceeding safe limits on six of nine planetary boundaries, and much of them is due to agrifood systems, which contribute 30 percent of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and impede climate goals. Despite the Paris Agreement's aims, warming rates point to a serious gap in meeting targets. Agrifood systems appear to face a dilemma: intensifying efforts to increase productivity while endangering climate goals – or curbing production to reduce emissions. This perceived trade-off has led to inaction and emboldens climate action skeptics who argue climate action harms efforts to address global hunger and malnutrition. Agrifood systems should address food security and nutrition needs and facilitate a large number of actions aligned with mitigation, adaptation and resilience objectives under the larger umbrella of climate action. The climate agenda itself could and should transform agrifood systems and mobilize climate finance to unlock their hidden potential. In the unfolding narrative of our global commitment to transform agrifood systems, FAO embarks on a presenting a Global Roadmap; Achieving SDG2 without breaching the 1.5C threshold. FAO's roadmap involves an extensive process that spans three years, starting with COP 28 in 2023. It commences with a global vision for what ails agrifood systems today and goes on to explore financing options for the actions required, before culminating in a discussion of how to attract concrete investment and policy packages by the time COP 30 takes place. It also examines how to integrate technical assistance into our strategies while supporting sustainable investment plans. Our objective is to create a repository of both bankable and non-bankable projects in various domains.The In Brief version of the roadmap contains the key messages and main points from the report, and is aimed at the media, policy makers and a more general public
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    Document
    Promoting agricultural inputs under the Food Aid Convention to increase food production in emergency-prone developing countries 2010
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    Assistance needs for the rapidly increasing emergency situations require more judicious responses on the part of donors, including the provision of critical agricultural inputs such as seeds, fertilizers and farming implements for reconstruction and recovery of the agriculture sector. The institutional framework governing food-related assistance has been at an impasse for some time, with the renegotiation of the Food Aid Convention (FAC) remaining in suspense, awaiting the conclusion of the un certain Doha Round of negotiations, although there have been fresh efforts to move the FAC process forward. The Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations is the key agency within the multilateral system responsible for coordinating donor efforts in the rehabilitation of agriculture in the aftermath of emergencies. The Organization has a keen interest in seeing that the FAC process is concluded soon, taking on board the new realities on the ground, in particular assisting affect ed communities to resume agricultural activity and return to self-reliance. An analysis of trends in natural and human-induced disasters over the last 30 years confirms the large increase in protracted emergency situations, whereby several countries experience a food emergency year after year. In addition, many of these countries suffer serious chronic food insecurity and these two problems (the transitory and the structural) cannot be addressed separately. A stop-gap approach based on sho rt-term food assistance is not sustainable in these situations. Interventions should also aim to break the cycle of long-term structural problems feeding into greater vulnerability in the short term. Increasing donor support in the form of agricultural inputs, together with meeting immediate food needs, is critical in expediting recovery and helping agricultural communities getting back on their feet. Meeting immediate food emergency needs has become the main priority of donors with nearly 80 percent of total food aid now used for that purpose compared with well below 20 percent up to 1990. At the same time donors’ funding arrangements have become more flexible with a large majority of donors providing cash resources to facilitate local purchases and triangular transactions, as well as funds for the purchase of agricultural inputs. While support for the agriculture sector within the United Nations Consolidated Appeals Process has increased in recent years, agriculture remains he avily underfunded in relation to identified needs and other sectors, with only 41 percent of the sector’s needs being met in recent years. Overall, FAO’s efforts in rehabilitation and recovery of the agriculture sector have been compromised by a lack of adequate funding. An analysis of a multitude of arrangements governing food-related assistance (the Consultative Sub-Committee on Surplus Disposal [CSSD], World Trade Organization [WTO] and FAC) shows that although they are guided by the legiti mate objective of food aid doing more good and less harm, often for a variety of reasons they are not conducive to a coherent framework and may compromise the effectiveness of this assistance. Among them, the FAC is much broader than the CSSD and the WTO, both as regards its food security objective and the specific provisions contained therein. Recognizing the importance of the FAC and expediting its negotiation to better meet its objectives has been the focus of attention by the internationa l community for some time and recent intensified 6 efforts by the Food Aid Committee aim at launching formal negotiations. This would also respond to recent policy initiatives and strategies of donors whereby humanitarian food assistance is increasingly seen as an integral part of efforts to address the structural causes of chronic food insecurity. The FAC is no longer seen as simply having an ‘instrument focus’ (i.e. food aid) but also a ‘problem focus’ (i.e. food security), becoming a part of the broader processes of needs assessment and the related longer-term developmental responses. This paper aims at making a contribution in the process of renegotiating the FAC, in particular as regards the recognition of the importance of agricultural inputs for the recovery and rehabilitation of the agriculture sector.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Food loss and waste and the right to adequate food: Making the connection
    Right to Food Discussion Paper
    2018
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    This Discussion paper explores the relationship between food loss and waste (FLW) and the right to adequate food. It focuses on the need to develop sustainable global consumption and production systems to contribute to the realization of the right to adequate food while it argues for a human rights-based approach to tackle FLW. As such, it presents key notions of FLW and expands on their impact for the realization of the right to adequate food. Simultaneously, it looks into the different components of the right to adequate food and offers ways through which its legal obligations could help processes and initiatives aimed at reducing FLW. The Discussion paper argues for a more holistic approach to reducing FLW and guaranteeing the right of each person to feed herself or himself in dignity. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) wishes to thank the Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID) for its financial support, which made this publication possible.

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