Thumbnail Image

The agroforestry practices in SAARC countries: A critical review

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Indicators to assess the contributions of forests, trees, and agroforestry to food security and nutrition at national level
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Forest, trees and agroforestry provide multiple contributions to Food Security and Nutrition (FSN), as shown by the GFEP report (2015) and the High-Level Panel of Experts on food security and nutrition report (HLPE 2017). However, there is currently no quantitative indicator to assess these contributions at national level. Here we propose options to fill this gap using four main themes to describe the contributions of forests, trees and agroforestry to food security and nutrition: • direct provision of food and feed; • provision of wood energy used for cooking food and boiling of water in developing countries which is critical for assimilation of nutrients and reduction of risks of diarrhea; • formal and informal employment, sources of income through sales of wood and non-wood orest products (NWFP) from forests, trees and agroforestry; • provision of ecosystem services that sustain food production through water and climate regulation; soil formation and protection, nutrient cycling, pest control and pollination. Some of these contributions, while well-known and described at local levels, like the contribution to livelihoods and to diets, are not included in national statistics. For others, particularly the contribution of ecosystem services to agricultural production, there are multiple dimensions which are difficult to measure even at a local scale. We will propose a set of indicators to track all of these contributions, using existing data that are available for all countries, such as fruit and nut consumption, woodfuel consumption, employment in forestry, and broader contribution of forests and trees to farming households through products, income and other benefits (e.g. ecosystem services, cultural value). We also suggest some ideas for how better more targeted data could be collected in the future. These proposals were discussed during the Expert Workshop in October 2019 in support of the CPF Joint Initiative on streamlining forest related reporting. Keywords: Food systems, Knowledge Management, Monitoring and data collection ID: 3485311
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Mainstreaming biodiversity in forestry
    Country case studies
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Forests harbour a large proportion of the Earth’s terrestrial biodiversity, which continues to be lost at an alarming rate. Deforestation is the single most important driver of forest biodiversity loss with 10 million ha of forest converted every year to other land uses, primarily for agriculture. Up to 30 percent of tree species are now threatened with extinction. As a consequence of overexploitation, wildlife populations have also been depleted across vast areas of forest, threatening the survival of many species. Protected areas, which are considered the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation, cover 18 percent of the world’s forests while a much larger 30 percent are designated primarily for the production of timber and non-wood forest products. These and other forests managed for various productive benefits play a critical role in biodiversity conservation and also provide essential ecosystem services, such as securing water supplies, providing recreational space, underpinning human well-being, ameliorating local climate and mitigating climate change. Therefore, the sustainable management of all forests is crucial for biodiversity conservation, and nations have committed to biodiversity mainstreaming under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Mainstreaming biodiversity in forestry requires prioritizing forest policies, plans, programmes, projects and investments that have a positive impact on biodiversity at the ecosystem, species and genetic levels. In practical terms, this involves the integration of biodiversity concerns into everyday forest management practice, as well as in long-term forest management plans, at various scales. It is a search for optimal outcomes across social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. This study is a collaboration between FAO and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), lead centre of the CGIAR research programme on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA). This report is a compilation of country case studies as supplementary material to the main publicaiton, which reviews progress and outlines the technical and policy tools available for countries and stakeholders, as well as the steps needed, to effectively mainstream biodiversity in forestry.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Mainstreaming biodiversity in forestry 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Forests harbour a large proportion of the Earth’s terrestrial biodiversity, which continues to be lost at an alarming rate. Deforestation is the single most important driver of forest biodiversity loss with 10 million ha of forest converted every year to other land uses, primarily for agriculture. Up to 30 percent of tree species are now threatened with extinction. As a consequence of overexploitation, wildlife populations have also been depleted across vast areas of forest, threatening the survival of many species. Protected areas, which are considered the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation, cover 18 percent of the world’s forests while a much larger 30 percent are designated primarily for the production of timber and non-wood forest products. These and other forests managed for various productive benefits play a critical role in biodiversity conservation and also provide essential ecosystem services, such as securing water supplies, providing recreational space, underpinning human well-being, ameliorating local climate and mitigating climate change. Therefore, the sustainable management of all forests is crucial for biodiversity conservation, and nations have committed to biodiversity mainstreaming under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Mainstreaming biodiversity in forestry requires prioritizing forest policies, plans, programmes, projects and investments that have a positive impact on biodiversity at the ecosystem, species and genetic levels. In practical terms, this involves the integration of biodiversity concerns into everyday forest management practice, as well as in long-term forest management plans, at various scales. It is a search for optimal outcomes across social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. This study is a collaboration between FAO and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), lead centre of the CGIAR research programme on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA). Illustrated by eight country case-studies, the report reviews progress and outlines the technical and policy tools available for countries and stakeholders, as well as the steps needed, to effectively mainstream biodiversity in forestry.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.