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Guidelines : Good agricultural practices for family agriculture









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    Document
    Report of the FAO Expert Consultation on a Good Agricultural Practice approach
    Rome, Italy, 10-12 November 2003
    2007
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    The concept of Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) has evolved in recent years in the context of a rapidly changing and globalizing food economy and as a result of the concerns and commitments of a wide range of stakeholders regarding food production and security, food safety and quality, and the environmental and social sustainability of agriculture. Given the trend in development and adoption of codes and standards related to Good Agricultural Practices by different actors, and co gnisant of the challenges of world agriculture, FAO initiated a process of consultation to seek understanding and consensus on the principles, indicators and means of applying GAP, and on the role an intergovernmental organisation such as FAO should play to support stakeholders in developing countries facing new commercial and governmental requirements. Following two initial electronic conferences on GAP in the context of Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Development, FAO member countries at the 17th Session of the Committee on Agriculture (COAG) in April 2003 recommended that FAO continue its initial work on the development of a GAP approach. In this context, FAO organized a multi-stakeholder expert consultation during 10-12 November 2003 to review and confirm its basic approach, provide guidance for addressing concerns, identify strategies for implementation and recommend actions for FAO in the development and implementation of a GAP approach. This d ocument serves as a summary of this Expert Consultation.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Good agricultural practices (GAP)
    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)
    2024
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    Groundnut, a significant oilseed crop in Myanmar, is predominantly cultivated by subsistence farmers in all the three regions of the Central Dry Zone. However, it has untapped potential for increased productivity, quality, and market competitiveness through improved crop technologies and the adoption of good agricultural practices (GAP). The adoption of GAP techniques, harmonious with natural agroecosystems and Indigenous Peoples' knowledge, including organic manuring, integrated pest management (IPM), and climate-resilient crop varieties, can be easily adopted by resource-poor farmers. Effective management of limited resources is achievable by careful selection and use of high-quality, environmentally safe inputs like seeds and fertilizers. The current emphasis on consumer awareness necessitates safe, quality food production and resource efficiency, emphasizing the need for better organization of groundnut growers through project-guided marketing to sustain productivity and increase income. Under the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ Global Agriculture and Food Security Climate-Friendly Agribusiness Value Chain (FAO-GAFSP-CFAVC) Programme, GAP dissemination for target crops, including groundnut, is a priority. This involves upgrading existing GAP standards based on Myanmar's and ASEAN's practices. The enhanced GAP version focuses on food safety, produce quality, worker health and safety, and environmental management. Implementing GAP will not only enhance food safety and quality but also promote ecological sustainability in groundnut production cropping systems. Validation and contextualization were achieved through comprehensive research, stakeholder discussions, and insights from relevant stakeholders, including FAO experts. GAP rollout involves capacity building among lead farmer organizations, public–private partners, and value chain actors. The framework covers pre- and post-harvest practices for safe, quality groundnut production tailored to small and medium farmers. Key messages facilitate agronomic management practices, supported by farmer organizations, sensitization, technical assistance, and market linkages. On-farm demonstrations, Farmer Field Schools (FFS), training, and information and communications technology (ICT) tools supplement GAP promotion. Existing user-friendly integrated pest management (IPM) handbooks and FFS curriculum for groundnut support the framework, leveraging farmers' capacity building and complementing affiliated GAP initiatives.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Good agricultural practices (GAP)
    Green gram (Vigna radiata [L.] Wilczek)
    2024
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    Myanmar ranks as the world's third-largest pulse producer, following Canada and India, cultivating crops like black gram, pigeon pea, chickpea, and green gram. Green gram constitutes a third of total pulse exports. To enhance productivity, quality, market competitiveness, and exports, Myanmar can leverage improved crop production technologies and adopt good agricultural practices (GAP). Small resource-poor farmers can readily adopt GAP's production standards, aligned with natural agroecosystems and Indigenous knowledge. Efficient management of limited resources depends on selecting quality, environmentally safe inputs. Green gram's success for quality and safe production existing adoption and achievements in the Central Dry Zone (CDZ) regions. In view of increased consumer awareness, ensuring food safety, quality, efficiency, and conservation becomes crucial. Strengthening farmers through organization and project-guided marketing is essential for sustained productivity and resource sustainability. Under the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ Global Agriculture and Food Security Climate Friendly Agribusiness Value Chain (FAO-GAFSP-CFAVC) Programme, GAP dissemination for five crops, including green gram, involves upgrading existing practices based on Myanmar’s GAP to ASEAN's GAP standards. The upgraded GAP version focuses on food safety, quality, worker health, safety, and environmental management. Implementing GAP enhances food safety and quality while promoting ecological sustainability in rice–legumes based production systems. Identified gaps in knowledge, access, and efficiency of inputs and services for green gram were addressed through a comprehensive situational analysis, involving project collaboration with various stakeholders including market actors. Validation and contextualization were achieved through data research, stakeholder discussions, and insights from relevant stakeholders. The dissemination of GAP involves capacity building of the farmers and relevant stakeholders, pulse growers associations, public–private partners, and value chain actors. The framework focuses pre- and post-harvest practices for safe, quality green gram production tailored to small and medium farmers. Key messages promote easy agronomic management practices. GAP rollout includes farmer organization support, technical assistance, market linkages, and training, supplemented by on-farm demonstrations, farmer field schools, and Information and communications technology (ICT) tools. User-friendly integrated pest management (IPM) handbooks and farmer field school (FFS) curriculum complement the framework, aiding farmers' capacity building and supporting existing GAP initiatives.

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