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Biodiversity mainstreaming in fisheries








This Infographic describes fisheries’ long-term evolution in consideration of biodiversity across its policy and practices. This accompanies and summarizes a fishery mainstreaming publication in the journal Marine Policy (see reference below), that was published to show how sustainable use sectors like fisheries have progressed in mainstreaming - a direct request of FAO by the Convention on Biological Diversity. Written by staff of FAO and IUCNs fisheries expert group, the paper and infographic attempts to show how fisheries has long worked on the process of integrating ecosystem issues in fisheries, as expected in Aichi Target 6, - i.e. mainstreaming of biodiversity in fisheries. This function is not complete and delivery needs to be strengthened, requiring further integration of effort across fisheries and biodiversity conservation initiatives.


Scientific Paper: Friedman, K., Garcia, S., Rice, J. 2018. Mainstreaming biodiversity in fisheries. Marine Policy
Friedman, K., Garcia, S., Rice, J., Agostini, V. 2018. Mainstreaming biodiversity in fisheries. FAO Infographic. Rome, FAO



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    Forests harbour a large proportion of the Earth’s terrestrial biodiversity, which continues to be lost at an alarming rate. Deforestation is the single most important driver of forest biodiversity loss with 10 million ha of forest converted every year to other land uses, primarily for agriculture. Up to 30 percent of tree species are now threatened with extinction. As a consequence of overexploitation, wildlife populations have also been depleted across vast areas of forest, threatening the survival of many species. Protected areas, which are considered the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation, cover 18 percent of the world’s forests while a much larger 30 percent are designated primarily for the production of timber and non-wood forest products. These and other forests managed for various productive benefits play a critical role in biodiversity conservation and also provide essential ecosystem services, such as securing water supplies, providing recreational space, underpinning human well-being, ameliorating local climate and mitigating climate change. Therefore, the sustainable management of all forests is crucial for biodiversity conservation, and nations have committed to biodiversity mainstreaming under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Mainstreaming biodiversity in forestry requires prioritizing forest policies, plans, programmes, projects and investments that have a positive impact on biodiversity at the ecosystem, species and genetic levels. In practical terms, this involves the integration of biodiversity concerns into everyday forest management practice, as well as in long-term forest management plans, at various scales. It is a search for optimal outcomes across social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. This study is a collaboration between FAO and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), lead centre of the CGIAR research programme on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA). Illustrated by eight country case-studies, the report reviews progress and outlines the technical and policy tools available for countries and stakeholders, as well as the steps needed, to effectively mainstream biodiversity in forestry.
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    Biodiversity is the foundation of ecosystem services to which human wellbeing is intimately linked. Biological resources are the pillars that support agriculture and mankind’s capacity to feed itself. The conservation and the sustainable use of biological diversity in agriculture are key to the long term sustainability of our food systems, and are therefore a global responsibility. The FAO Biodiversity Mainstreaming Platform adopts a systemic and holistic approach to biodiversity mainstreaming, fostering and highlighting the synergies between FAO’s work on biodiversity and connected areas, including agroecology, indigenous peoples, incentives for ecosystem services, agrobiodiversity, low carbon agriculture, nutrition, sustainable rice production, and pollination, among other relevant subjects. The goals of the FAO Biodiversity Mainstreaming Strategy include a) sustainable use of biodiversity through landscape and ecosystem approaches, b) conserve, enhance and restore biodiversity and ensure the continued provision of ecosystem services, c) promote sustainable food and agriculture systems that integrate biodiversity considerations throughout value chains and d) enhance the contribution of biodiversity, and associated indigenous and local knowledge, to food security and nutrition, ending poverty, and safeguarding resilient livelihoods. Regional consultations are being organized during the second semester of 2019 as part of the preparation of the Biodiversity Mainstreaming Strategy. The Regional Consultative Meeting on Biodiversity Mainstreaming across Agricultural Sectors in the Near East and North Africa Region (NENA) is part of this process, and is being organized by FAO in partnership with the Ministry of Agriculture and Environment of Jordan.
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    African Regional Multi-stakeholder Dialogue on Biodiversity Mainstreaming across Agricultural Sectors (Kigali, Rwanda, November 4–5, 2019)
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    Biodiversity is critical for safeguarding global food security, underpinning healthy and nutritious diets, improving rural livelihoods, and enhancing the resilience of people and communities. The recent alarming findings on the threats of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nation (FAO)’s The State of the World’s Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture and the global assessment report of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services have put agricultural sectors at the center of the debate in sustaining the future of human well-being and livability of the planet. Against this background, the FAO Conference, in 2017, welcomed FAO’s initiative to act as Biodiversity Mainstreaming Platform1 (the Platform) and requested FAO to facilitate, in collaboration with its partners, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and other UN organizations, the integration in a structured and coherent manner of actions for the conservation, sustainable use, management and restoration of biological diversity across agricultural sectors at national, regional and international levels. FAO, working with the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) co-organized the first global multistakeholder dialogue on biodiversity mainstreaming in Rome (May 2018) and four regional dialogues for Latin America and the Caribbean (Mexico, October 2018), Asia and the Pacific (Thailand, July 2019), the Near East (Jordan, November 2019), and Africa (Rwanda, November 2019).

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