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FAO Roundtable on the Competitiveness of Pacific Island Small and Medium Agro-processing Enterprises, 11-13 April 2012, Nadi, Fiji Islands

Roundtable report








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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Agribusiness Roundtable: Small and medium agri-processing enterprises competitiveness challenges in central and Eastern Europe
    17-20 April 2011, Budapest, Hungary
    2012
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    Rapid urbanization and commercialization of agriculture is increasing the demand for processed agricultural and food products, and as a consequence eff ectively excludes farmers from direct participation in markets. On the one hand, farmers (particularly small farmers) faced with pressures from the agro-industry to supply raw materials in required quantities are experiencing diffi culties integrating into value chains. On the other hand, local agroindustries, challenged by global and reg ional competition and the need to comply with international regulations, are also experiencing diffi culties in establishing their position in the supply chains of multinational retailers, which if they could achieve, would enable them to pull the demand for local agricultural products. Small and medium sized agri-processing enterprises are responsible for generating a large share of products and services in the agricultural sector and play a critical role in increasing demand for raw ma terials. They create income and employment in rural areas where the opportunities for employment are frequently sparse. Small and medium sized agri-processing enterprises (SMAEs) can play a critical role in creating rural income and employment opportunities, through the demand they create for raw material supplies from smaller and medium scale farmers. SMAEs that are appropriately capitalized and managed can produce high quality branded and labeled products, which can increase export r evenues and reduce reliance on imported products. However, there are major constraints that must be addressed in order to realize the full developmental potential of SMAEs.
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    Good packaging practices for micro, small and medium-sized food processing enterprises in the Caribbean Community and Common Market 2024
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    Micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) continue to serve as a major source of employment and income generation in the agriculture and tourism sectors in countries of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM). Most MSMEs are small businesses run by families or by a few individuals. While this helps to keep labour and overhead costs to a minimum, it creates a suboptimum economy of scale. Competition is also increased because of the large number of small operations and challenges that hinder penetration of the export market, especially with the increasing complexities of international standards demanded by developed countries. Additionally, rising standards of living in many CARICOM countries have increased demand from domestic consumers for higher quality food and assurances of food safety. This creates the need for urgent measures that will help MSMEs in CARICOM to become more efficient in crop production, supply chain management, food processing and packaging techniques and to gain a better understanding of the changing nature of the domestic, regional and international markets.This technical manual focuses on food packaging and seeks to highlight its critical role in reducing food loss and waste. Users of this manual will also be exposed to packaging techniques that help improve the marketability of agricultural commodities produced and processed in the region. This potential has been fostered by an increasing middle-class population, a vibrant market for tourism, a diversity of cultures and, thanks to an increasing diaspora, increasing markets in importing countries.
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    Book (series)
    Report of the FAO/SPC Pacific Islands Regional Consultation on the Development of Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries, Noumea, New Caledonia, 12-14 June 2012 2012
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    During its twenty-ninth Session in 2011, the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) approved the development of a new international instrument on small-scale fisheries in the form of international guidelines (SSF Guidelines). The strategic development process of these SSF Guidelines consists in an extensive consultation process with governments, regional organizations, civil society organizations and small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities. In this context, a Pacific Islands Regional Consultation on the Development of Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries was co-organized by FAO and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) from 12-14 June 2012 in Noumea, New Caledonia. The consultation brought together 38 participants representing governments, the fishing industry and civil society organizations (CSOs) from 17 countries and territories in the Pacific Islands region to share experiences with small-scale fisheries policies and practices. The consulta tion also discussed the thematic areas of the Zero Draft of the International Guidelines on Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the context of the Pacific Islands region and provided advice for improvement. The consultation confirmed the importance of small-scale fisheries as a livelihood contributing to food and nutrition security, poverty alleviation and economic development in the Pacific Islands region which has to face challenges from population growth and climate change imp acts and suffers from geographical remoteness. The SSF Guidelines were perceived as an important tool for securing sustainable small-scale fisheries governance and development. In terms of governance of rights, resource management and stewardship, customary right systems are a fundamental part of most fishery governance systems in the region. Fishing communities are integrated and generally have an equitable rather than a marginalized role in society. In the Pacific Island Region fishing i s in fact a respected and acknowledged profession, not an activity of last resort. Still, the consultation agreed on the importance of encouraging policies to protect small-scale fisheries livelihoods, to promote income opportunities and to emphasize the socio-economic and cultural importance of small-scale fisheries. Newly established or strengthened fishing community associations are expected to play an important role in this regard.

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