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Adding Value to Livestock Diversity - Marketing to promote local breeds and improve livelihoods







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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Somalia 2017 2017
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    Three years of drought have taken a heavy toll on the rangelands and water supplies that Somalia’s 7+ million pastoralists rely on to keep their animals alive and healthy. Livestock are their most important possessions – trade items bartered for food and other essentials; high-value assets used as collateral; the source of daily dairy protein. But malnourished animals do not produce as much milk. They cannot be traded, or only traded for less. And even minor illnesses can kill livestock weakened by a lack of food and water. Losses of goats, camels, sheep and cattle in 2017 have ranged from 20-40 percent – reaching 60 percent in the hardest-hit locations. When animals die or stop producing, people go hungry. When animals are lost, so are people’s livelihoods. To keep livestock alive and producing, FAO is engaged in a massive animal treatment campaign, deploying 150 fast-moving teams of veterinarians across Somalia. Our goal: To provide simple and effective care to as many animals as po ssible as rapidly as possible. As conditions have warranted, we have also delivered large volumes of water to support people’s herds. Saving animals saves human lives and livelihoods.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Livestock breeds of China 1984
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    This book gives a brief account of the distribution of livestock in various regions of China, as well as the breed characteristics developed under different ecological conditions. An attempt is made to illustrate the influence on breed formation of environmental factors, in addition to those of genetics and selection. The livestock breeds enumerated Include 14 horse, 2 camel, 14 yellow cattle, 4 dairy and milk/meat dual-purpose cattle, 8 water buffalo (types), 6 yak (types), 13 sheep, 18 goat an d 15 swine. An understanding of animal ecology will undoubtedly guide plans for regionalitzation of livestock In our country. It is also pointed out that our rich breed resources provide us with genetic material of great value in animal breeding. our swine breeds Influenced the improvement or formation of some foreign breeds In the past, and may have even more influence In the future, though this may not be foreseen at present. We should, therefore, promptly study breed characteristics, and wo rk on the Investigation, protection, selection, development and utilization of these valuable resources. The present work is not merely an English translation of the author's recent book, published in Chinese In 1980. It is greatly expanded, and a new chapter on Goat Breeds has been added. Some revisions and necessary corrections have been wde and more illustrations added to ensure that readers will more easily obtain a general idea of the ecological characteristics of livestock breeds in Chin a. Attempts made here to Illustrate the relationship between our livestock breeds and their environments are restricted by the knowledge of the author and the reference data available. This book is just a beginning, and it is earnestly hoped that further systematic and Intensive studies in the field of animal ecology will be made by others.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Securing tomorrow’s food - Promoting the sustainable use of farm animal genetic resources. Information for action
    Promoting the sustainable use of farm animal genetic resources. Information for action
    2002
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    The twentieth century has witnessed spectacular advances in many areas, including agriculture and medicine. The consequences have been both positive and negative: extended human life spans, increased food production and other achievements stand against a staggering growth in population, widespread environmental degradation and the fact that about 826 million people, or about 13% of the world’s population, still go hungry. The development of high-performing livestock and poultry breeds has n o doubt greatly contributed to the increase of food production, especially in temperate climates. But their indiscriminate export into tropical countries has often ended in failure, as the animals cannot stand the heat, need optimal inputs and readily succumb to disease. To overcome these weaknesses, the ongoing approach is the widespread promotion of crossbreeding high-yielding breeds with hardy and welladapted local animals. The price of this and other developments is high: local breeds are disappearing at a rate of two breeds a week. This has far-reaching consequences, not only for our generation but also for the generations to come.

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