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Supporting Agribusiness Growth and Development Through Enhanced Marketing Systems and Value Additio - TCP/UGA/3601









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    Book (series)
    The State of Food and Agriculture, 2005
    Agricultural trade and poverty can trade work for the poor?
    2005
    Can trade work for the poor? The State of Food and Agriculture 2005 examines the many ways trade and trade liberalization affect the poor and food-insecure. It is found that trade can be a catalyst for change, promoting conditions that enable the poor to raise their incomes and live longer, healthier and more productive lives. But because the poor often survive on a narrow margin, they are particularly vulnerable in any reform process, especially in the short run as productive sectors and labour markets adjust. Opening national agricultural markets to international competition especially from subsidized competitors before basic market institutions and infrastructure are in place can undermine the agriculture sector with long-term negative consequences for poverty and food security. Among the many important lessons from this analysis is the need for policy-makers to consider carefully how trade and complementary policies can be used to promote pro-poor growth. The report recommends a twin-track approach: investing in human capital, institutions and infrastructure to enable the poor to take advantage of trade-related opportunities, while establishing safety nets to protect vulnerable members of society.
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    Project
    Strengthening and Promoting Agricultural Interventions With a Social Protection Lens - TCP/UGA/3603 2020
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    Despite the significant transformation of Uganda’s economy and prevailing peace, the country’s economic growth has been fluctuating at a declining rate since 2008-2009, registering its lowest growth rate of 4.8 percent in the financial year from 2013 to 2014. Given the current status of the economy, GDP growth is not currently expected to perform above these levels. In addition, poverty, vulnerability and income inequalities continue to affect a large section of Uganda’s population, with over 19.7 percent still living below the poverty line and 43.3 percent still insecure and vulnerableto poverty. Despite the significant role that social protection can play in helping the vulnerable to build their resilience, many of the agricultural interventions implemented in Uganda do not adequately address the challenge of poverty from a social protection perspective. Indeed, there is a limited capacity and understanding of the role social protection in the agricultural sector, with food and nutrition security interventions aimed at the poor often implemented in isolation by different stakeholders and, as a result, poorlycoordinated.
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    Project
    Improve the Competitiveness and Increase Post-Harvest Value Chain of Smallholder Farmers - TCP/URT/3604 2020
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    The United Republic of Tanzania is a low-income rural economy, with most citizens participating in agriculture for household income generation. Agriculture represents about 23 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) and 30 percent of export earnings, and employs 66.9 percent of the working population. In 2000/01 agriculture accounted for 31 percent of GDP but has since fallen to 23 percent despite an annual GDP growth rate of 5-6 percent. The poor performance of the sector is caused by several factors, including poor extension services, financial illiteracy and inadequate access to financial services by smallholder farmers. In collaboration with MoA, the project aimed to address these challenges by improving the competitiveness and enhancing the post-harvest management capacity of VC (smallholder farmers and processors), building the management capacity of producers’ organizations, creating sustainable linkages with other agricultural VC actors, and improving post-harvest practices to enhance farmers’ competitiveness. The project also built linkages between farmer organizations (FOs) and other service providers, encouraging the development of a long-term market strategy and contributing to the national objective to increase agricultural productivity and reduce rural poverty. The project was further expected to increase and stabilize the incomes of smallholder farmers producing paddy in Iringa district, building capacity in post-harvest handling and strengthening the commercial relationships between FOs and other rice VC actors. Market linkages between producer and other value chain actors such as traders and processors were established by the project, with 15 new linkages being forged.

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