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Female leadership and One Health

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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Gender animal health and information communication technology
    Sustainable business in animal health service provision through training for veterinary paraprofessionals: Lessons learned, no. 3
    2022
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    Livestock diseases have gender implications. Women, who make up 60 percent of the world’s poor livestock keepers can be particularly affected and are therefore an important target group for last-mile animal health services. To promote the provision of comprehensive and inclusive animal health services the “Sustainable Business in Animal Health Service Provision through Training of Veterinary Paraprofessionals” project, aims to develop and evaluate a gender-sensitive training model to improve VPP services in three pilot countries: Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda. This will be done through Continuing Professional Development (CPD) delivered through a blended learning approach that includes both online and practical face-to-face training courses. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is not gender neutral. The digital divide, or existing inequalities in ICT ownership, access, and control, is closely linked to structural inequalities and gender norms and still prevents many women from reaping the benefits of ICT on a global scale. Women's limited access to ICTs is a barrier to animal health and one of the reasons why women tend to be less productive and efficient than men in livestock sector, negatively impacting household food and nutrition security. To inform the gender-sensitive project design for virtual training of VPPs, dissemination of information to smallholder farmers, and digital engagement to connect VPPs with smallholder farmers, a desk study was conducted on gender, animal health, and ICT in Africa. This report summarizes key findings and lessons learned from this research.
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    Policy brief
    Women's leadership and gender equality in climate action and disaster risk reduction in Africa
    A call for action
    2021
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    Despite the key roles that rural women play in food systems, in agrobiodiversity conservation, natural resource management, food production, preparation and marketing, rural women are particularly affected by the impacts of climate change due to limited access and control over resources fundamental to adaptation and limited participation in decision-making processes. Similarly, they lack equal access to productive resources needed for agricultural livelihoods, and are often the last to eat when food is scarce. Decision-making and leadership in climate action and governance are also male dominated and the decisions less likely to respond to women’s needs and wants. It is therefore urgent to ensure that policy and programmatic response for building back better and strengthening the resilience of food systems and communities takes into account the interests and constraints of women and men from diverse social, cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds. For this to happen, it is important to strengthen women’s leadership and participation at all levels of climate action and governance.
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    Book (series)
    National gender profile of agriculture and rural livelihoods
    Bangladesh
    2023
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    Women account for about half of the agricultural workforce and over 63 percent of the rural female workforce is engaged in agriculture in Bangladesh (Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics [BBS], 2018). Under the leadership of the Government of Bangladesh, the country has made significant progress towards gender equality and advancing the status of women and girls, particularly in education and health care. The country ranked fiftieth among 153 countries in the Global Gender Gap Report for 2020. Bangladesh has adopted many laws and policies to promote gender equality, including the National Women Development Policy 2011. Gender inequality continues to manifest in forms of gender-based discrimination, which includes restrictive social norms, access to and control over resources, barriers to accessing services and involvement in decision-making processes. Beyond the burden of unpaid care work, the lack of economic empowerment is a massive loss for Bangladesh’s economy, which could otherwise benefit from the equal participation of women. FAO recognizes the centrality of gender equality in its mandate to achieve food security for all by raising levels of nutrition, improving agricultural productivity, natural resource management and improving the lives of rural populations. The FAO Policy on Gender Equality 2020–2030 aims to advance equality of voice, agency and access to resources and services between women and men in sustainable agricultural production and rural development, identifying gender mainstreaming and women-targeted interventions as a two-fold strategy.

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