Thumbnail Image

The Soils of Al-Mahawib (Dhamar Governorate).

Technical note 7.







Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Water quality in agriculture: Risks and risk mitigation 2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This publication, Water Quality in Agriculture: Risks and Risk Mitigation, emphasizes technical solutions and good agricultural practices, including risk mitigation measures suitable for the contexts of differently resourced institutions working in rural as well as urban and peri-urban settings in low- and middle-income countries. With a focus on sustainability of the overall land use system, the guidelines also cover possible downstream impacts of farm-level decisions. As each country has a range of site-specific conditions related to climate, soil and water quality, crop type and variety, as well as management options, subnational adjustments to the presented guidelines are recommended. Water Quality in Agriculture: Risks and Risk Mitigation, is intended for use by national and subnational governmental authorities, farm and project managers, extension officers, consultants and engineers to evaluate water quality data, and identify potential problems and solutions related to water quality. The presented guidelines will also be of value to the scientific research community and university students. The chapters in this publication address the following topics: Chapter 2 describes the linkages between water quality and achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and the need for water quality monitoring. Chapter 3 provides an overview of existing water quality guidelines and standards across the world, including those reliant on technological advances and stringent water quality monitoring, and others based on health-based targets, as recommended by WHO. Chapter 4 is dedicated to pathogenic threats, in particular from domestic wastewater, while the elaborated Chapter 5 targets chemical risks with significant emphasis on salinity. The interlinkages between water quality and aquaculture and water quality and livestock production are described in Chapters 6 and 7, respectively. The importance of water quality for a healthy environment and ecology is explored in Chapter 8, and further extended to watersheds and river basin scales in Chapter 9, looking at the approaches used to analyze, monitor, and manage water quality, and possible downstream impacts in their larger geographical context. Finally, Chapter 10 provides an overview of the most common and/or significant barriers and drivers of relevance for the adoption of water reuse guidelines and best practices within a given regulatory and institutional context with special attention to low- and middle-income countries.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Bioenergy: A sustainable solution to landscape degradation
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Forest and landscapes provide innumerable ecosystem benefits. These ecosystem benefits are threatened by global land degradation which is made worse by global climate crisis and population explosion. Bioenergy as a renewable source of energy offer solutions to manage and restore a significant portion of degraded landscape, ameliorate global warming while providing food and energy security. This paper explores current trends and case studies covering the benefits of biofuels and biochar and their role in landscape restoration. Research shows that bioenergy crops reduce land degradation. Biofuel the yield product, mitigates carbon emissions and contributes to renewable energy demand. Furthermore, Biochar, one of its byproducts enhances soil fertility, improves crop productivity, contributes to the filtration of wastewater and benefit food security. Opportunity exists in peri-urban, urban and forest landscape to contribute to bioenergy availability with respect to biomass feedstock. The potential negative effects that may result from its use and production such as land-use change, and land use intensification can be reduced through appropriate land zoning. In general, these renewable products are still relatively underexplored and underutilized especially in developing country context. Apart from the environmental benefits bioenergy offers opportunity for socioeconomic growth and development since energy power these growths. It is concluded that biomass technology must be encouraged, promoted, invested, implemented, and demonstrated across landscapes. It is recommended that choice of appropriate raw material and efficient technology for bioenergy as well as other bioproducts production is of immense importance in order to produce high quality product with reduced environmental impact. Also, to maximize the benefits of bioenergy and bioproducts, there is need for policies and incentives that encourage their proper utilization and minimizes negative effect that may arise. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation, Landscape management, Climate change, Innovation, Adaptive and integrated management ID: 3487310
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Pro-poor legal and institutional frameworks for urban and peri-urban agriculture 2012
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Urbanization is one of the key drivers of change in the world today as the world’s urban population will almost double by 2050. Providing support to the most vulnerable in an urbanizing world demands discussions on food, agriculture and cities in the context of rural- urban linkages. Policies need to address a very wide range of issues in order to link urbanization, food and nutrition security and livelihoods: how and where to produce enough food for urban dwellers? What infrastructure is needed ? How can cities preserve the surrounding ecosystems? The “Food for the Cities” initiative of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) promotes a food system approach supported by a great variety of areas such as urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) and forestry, support to small producers in urban and peri-urban areas, land tenure, food supply, nutrition education, school gardens, waste management and re-use of wastewater. All stakeholders from the public sector, the private sector and the civil society need to work together at global, national and local levels. FAO seeks to bring these stakeholders into a neutral forum for international discussions. This legislative study aims to promote an understanding of the key elements and issues to be addressed by a pro-poor legal and institutional framework for the practice of urban and peri- urban agriculture. Several case studies from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, Ghana, and Uganda are included to this end. It is hoped that this study will provide guidance to national legislators, ministers and administrations, mayors and other municipal officials, as well as lawyers involved in drafting legislation and regulations or advising on or advocating for better legal frameworks for urban and peri-urban agriculture.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.