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Livestock to 2020 : the next food revolution

The Next Food Revolution









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    Project
    Strengthening One Health Approaches for Countries in the Asia Pacific Region - TCP/RAS/3620 2020
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    Recognizing that the Asia and Pacific region was undergoing profound changes as a result of economic growth, urbanization, migration and climate change, and considering the effect of these changes on agricultural and food systems and the environment with consequences for food production, safety and availability in the coming decades, the 33 rd Asia and the Pacific Regional Conference, held in 2016 requested a Regional Initiative on One Health Priority areas developing FAO's earlier work on zoonotic diseases and anti microbial resistance ( were identified A Regional Workshop involving 17 countries at which One Health issues in each country were discussed, gaps identified and plans of action proposed was held in Bangkok in October 2017 Following this, three countries Nepal, Papua New Guinea and Viet Nam expressed strong interest in taking part in a regional project Papua New Guinea requested support to raise awareness of food safety and improve biosecurity, including plant health, animal health, hygiene and public health measures Nepal requested assistance in reducing risks to human and occupational health through sustainable agriculture practices and improved food safety to advance nutrition within food systems, in addition to ongoing work on zoonotic diseases and AMR Viet Nam requested support to build capacity and update legal frameworks for pesticide use regulations, residue control for trade and safe and sustainable agriculture production Addressing the use of chemicals for chronic plant health problems and the resulting damage to the ecosystem and improving food safety to advance nutrition within food systems were named as priorities However, at the time the project was implemented, FAO Viet Nam did not have an FAO Representative in place Communications between FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific and the Viet Nam country office and the concerned line ministry were considerably delayed By the time a FAO Representative was appointed, much of the implementation period had elapsed and there was little time available to deliver the originally planned activities In addition, the Government of Sri Lanka expressed interest that FAO provide technical support to develop a food safety policy and strategic plan for the country The external review of the food safety system in Sri Lanka, which was conducted by FAO in 2016 identified the non availability of a food safety policy and strategic framework as one of the key gaps in the country’s food safety programme Therefore, the Government requested that the World Health Organization ( and FAO).
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidelines resistance management and integrated parasite control in ruminants 2004
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    Population growth, rapidly increasing urbanization and growth in income in developing countries are creating a tremendous increase in the demand for food of animal origin. This livestock revolution is demand-driven, illustrated by the fact that meat consumption in developing countries grew approximately three times more than it did in the developed world during the period from the early 1970s to the mid 1990s. During the same period the production of animal food products also grew most dramatically in the countries with the increased demand. In fact the meat production in developing countries, with the exception of sub-Saharan Africa, grew at more than five times the rate in the developed countries. The projections of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) using IMPACT (International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Consumption) are that the consumption of meat and milk in developing countries will grow by about 3 percent per year between now (2003) and 2020 (Delgado et al., 1999). It is likely that this will improve the livelihood of small and medium scale market oriented farmers but only if an enabling environment is created including access to credit, development of infrastructure and animal production and health services. Farmers need access to information regarding disease control and livestock management supporting their ability to decide where to invest their resources to increase production and productivity.
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    Article
    Achieving Antimicrobial Stewardship on the Global Scale: Challenges and Opportunities 2022
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    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been clearly identified as a major global health challenge. It is a leading cause of human deaths and also has a toll on animals, plants, and the environment. Despite the considerable socio-economic impacts, the level of awareness of the problem remains woefully inadequate, and antimicrobials are not generally recognized as a global common good, one that everyone has a role and responsibility to conserve. It is imperative for antimicrobial stewardship to be more widely implemented to achieve better control of the AMR phenomenon. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations plays an important role in promoting and facilitating antimicrobial stewardship. The specific needs to be addressed and barriers to be overcome, in particular, in low- and middle-income countries in order to implement antimicrobial stewardship practices in agrifood systems are being identified. As a global community, it is essential that we now move beyond discussing the AMR problem and focus on implementing solutions. Thus, FAO provides multi-pronged support for nations to improve antimicrobial stewardship through programs to strengthen governance, increase awareness, develop and enhance AMR surveillance, and implement best practices related to antimicrobial resistance in agrifood systems. For example, FAO is developing a platform to collect data on AMR in animals and antimicrobial use (AMU) in plants (InFARM), working on a campaign to reduce the need to use antimicrobials, studying the use of alternatives to the use of antimicrobials (especially those used for growth promotion) and actively promoting the implementation of the Codex Alimentarius AMR standards. Together, these will contribute to the control of AMR and also bring us closer to the achievement of multiple sustainable development goals

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