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Proceedings of the FAO Symposium on Poverty Reduction and Promotion of Agricultural Investment 10 March 2010, Tokyo, Japan






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    Book (stand-alone)
    Public-Private Partnerships for Agribusines Development 2016
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    High levels of investments are required to unleash the potential of agriculture for sustainable development and poverty reduction in developing countries, but low public budgetary allocations to the sector have slowed growth. To address this problem, innovative partnerships that bring together business, government and civil society actors are increasingly being promoted as a mechanism for pooling much-needed financing while mitigating some of the risks of doing business in the agriculture sector . Commonly referred to as public–private partnerships (PPPs), these initiatives are expected to contribute to the pursuit of sustainable agricultural development that is inclusive of smallholder farmers. However, there remain many unanswered questions about the types of project that may suitably be governed by PPPs and about the partnerships’ effectiveness in delivering on these objectives. To improve understanding of the potential benefits and challenges of agri-PPPs, this publication provides an analysis of 70 PPP cases gathered from 15 developing countries, together with evidence from FAO’s support to the review of PPP policies for agriculture in Southeast Asia and Central America. Four common project types are identified: i) partnerships that aim to develop agricultural value chains; ii) partnerships for joint agricultural research, innovation and technology transfer; iii) partnerships for building and upgrading market infrastructure; and iv) partnerships for the delivery of busine ss development services to farmers and small and medium enterprises. The main lessons are synthesized, including the public skills and institutions required to enable more effective partnerships with the private sector, and the circumstances under which PPPs are likely to be the best modality for achieving sustainable development outcomes. The conclusion reached is that while there is evidence of positive contributions to sustainable agricultural development objectives, there remain several outs tanding issues associated with the impact of PPPs on poverty reduction and inclusion, which still need to be addressed. When deciding whether or not to engage in an agri-PPP, policy-makers should aim to ensure that the partnership will represent value for money and generate public benefits that exceed those that could be achieved through alternative modes of public procurement or through private investment alone.
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    Project
    Integrating Livestock into Agricultural Statistics
    The AU-IBAR, FAO, ILRI, WB Data Innovation Project; Joint paper of the World Bank, FAO, AU-IBAR, ILRI with support from the Gates Foundation
    2010
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    The growing demand for food of animal origin developing countries, stimulated by population growth, gains in real per capita income and urbanization, represents an opportunity for some livestock dependent poor to escape poverty. However, because of the dearth of livestock-related data, the linkages between livestock, economic development and poverty reduction remain to a large extent unclear, which constrains the design, implementation and monitoring of pro-poor livestockrelated polici es and investments. This paper provides an introduction to the Gates-funded Livestock in Africa: Improving Data for Better Policies Project being implemented by AU-IBAR, FAO, ILRI and WB. This project has the overarching objective to assist African governments in better collecting and analyzing data which support public and private investments in the livestock sector that benefit the less well-to-do. A variety of livestock-related data can be collected at country level, but the current limited understanding of the livestock-poverty interface makes it difficult to identify priority data to gather and process for formulating policies and investments which promote equitable growth of the livestock sector. In addition, the role and mandate of the public sector in providing specific information is often unclear, and stakeholders tend to look for data and indicators which support specific investments or government objectives – such as, for example, the number of livestock to be vaccinated or prices for live animals in major regional markets – often disregarding the broader livestock-poverty interface. There are also technical difficulties associated with ‘measuring livestock’, due to the existence of hundreds of breeds; regular and irregular herd mortality and reproduction rate; livestock movements; impact of livestock age and animal diseases on productivity; and others.
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    National Forest Funds (NFFs)
    Towards a solid architecture and good financial governance
    2013
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    In recent years, National Forest Funds (NFFs) have regained international attention as potential solutions to improve financial governance and the administration of funds in the forestry sector. NFFs are financing mechanisms solely dedicated to improving the conservation and sustainable use of forest resources. They are usually established in order to pursue forest related activities independent from traditional budgetary allocation restrictions and are typically endowed with funds from national budgets, ODA and dedicated multior bilateral funding streams (e.g. REDD+ funding). If well-managed and administered, NFFs can be effective in meeting a number of challenges in the forest sector including: advancing long-term investment needs; supporting the decentralisation and devolution of forest management; leveraging additional sources of funding; encouraging private sector investments; promoting the production of forest ecosystem services; adapting forestry spending to the seasonality of operations (e.g. planting season); stimulating more effective forest management; and creating increased transparency and accountability. NFFs can vary significantly both in their stated purpose and the way in which they operate. Indeed, an NFF can function either as a transfer fund or catalytic fund, or perform both functions simultaneously. While a transfer fund can be defined as a distribution platform for funding streams from donors to beneficiaries (mainly from public sources), a catalyti c fund provides finance/support to overcome socio-economic obstacles/crises and to prepare future commercial development more and more independently from public sources.

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