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Enhancing Socio-Economic Integration of Refugees and Host Communities in Refugee Hosting Areas of Ethiopia - UNJP/ETH/106/HCR









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    Project
    Supporting the Energy Needs of Refugees and Host Communities Through the Establishment of Sustainable Wood Fuel Management Strategies and Plans in Ethiopia - TCP/ETH/3602 2021
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    Since 1984 Ethiopia has received an influx of refugees from the Sudan and South Sudan, and they have been housed in various refugee camps all over the country An estimated 735 165 refugees resided in Ethiopia at the time of this project’s inception, and 37 percent of them, or 271 435 individuals, lived in the camps in Gambella Regional State The main source of fuel used in these camps and in the surrounding areas was wood, and the main use of this wood was for cooking Owning to the large amount of wood needed to support both the refugee population and the host communities in Gambella Regional State, local forests were experiencing severe degradation Compounding this issue were other factors, including a fragile and already degraded natural environment, particularly in the highlands and the north of the country, and economic activity and population settlement, which further impinged on natural resources, negatively impacting forests and biodiversity A final contributing factor which rendered this situation even more severe were problems of drought and flooding According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees ( there was an increase in arrivals in camps located in Gambella Regional State in 2016 when this project began Most of the new arrivals were said to have fled intra ethnic clashes in the eastern part of South Sudan Many of them were unaccompanied and separated children who had walked in the jungle for several days before reaching the camps.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Rapid Woodfuel Assessment - 2017 Baseline for Bidi Bidi Refugee Settlement, Uganda 2017
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    Uganda is host to more than 1 million refugees who have fled famine, conflict and insecurity in the neighbouring countries of Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan. The recent influx of refugees from South Sudan prompted one of Uganda’s most severe humanitarian emergencies and led to the establishment of the Bidibidi settlement in Yumbe District in August 2016. The Bidibidi refugee settlement is now the largest refugee-hosting area in the world with 272 206 refugees. It h as increased pressure on the environment due to tree felling for settlement establishment and to meet ongoing household demand for woodfuel for cooking and heating. FAO and UNHCR initiated a joint rapid woodfuel assessment in March 2017 to determine the supply and demand of woodfuel resources in the area. The assessment had three components: 1) an assessment of woodfuel demand; 2) an assessment of woodfuel supply; and 3) the identification of interlinkages, gaps, opportunities and alternative sc enarios. Data and information were obtained through a desk review of existing documents, field surveys, and remote sensing analysis.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools in Kenya’s Kalobeyei settlement
    Strengthening the capacity of refugees and host communities to produce, process and consume nutritious food in Turkana County
    2020
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    Agriculture is the main livelihood for the majority of Kenyans, contributing 26 percent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In rural areas, more than 70 percent of informal employment comes from agriculture. However, in the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs), recurring droughts and erratic weather patterns have resulted in low productivity, food shortages and price increases, presenting significant roadblocks to nutrition. Despite progress in recent years, one in every four children under five years old (26 percent of children) in Kenya is impacted by chronic malnutrition, while acute child malnutrition rates remain high in the ASALs. Displacement and conflict have further exacerbated malnutrition and food insecurity. Kenya is host to 494 585 refugees and asylum seekers, mainly from South Sudan and Somalia. Among those, 186 000 live in Turkana County, for the most part divided between Kakuma refugee camp and Kalobeyei settlement. Interventions focusing solely on increasing agricultural production have not necessarily translated to improved nutrition or diet. Against that backdrop, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has promoted nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools (FFS) providing community-facilitated training sessions on crop production and livestock, with additional one‑month nutrition modules on producing, processing, preserving and culinary preparation of foods with a high-nutrient content.

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