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FAO Rapid Results Drought Response Plan Somalia 2016/17










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    Booklet
    Drought in the Horn of Africa: Revised rapid response and mitigation plan to avert a humanitarian catastrophe
    January–December 2022
    2022
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    The Horn of Africa is facing the third severe La Niña‑induced drought episode in a decade, and the region is on the verge of a catastrophe if humanitarian assistance is not urgently scaled up and sustained. Drought is exacerbating the humanitarian situation in a region already facing high levels of exisiting food insecurity. In Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia, 18.4 million people are projected to be in Crisis (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification [IPC] Phase 3) or worse levels of high acute food insecurity due solely to the drought. An unprecedented fourth, below-average rainy season has just occurred in these countries, while Djibouti also experienced erratic rainfall in 2021. Drought is among the most devastating of natural hazards – crippling food production, depleting pastures, disrupting markets, and, at its most extreme, causing widespread human and animal deaths. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) revised rapid response and mitigation plan for the Horn of Africa aggregates FAO's components of recent humanitarian appeals. It provides further details on what urgently needs to happen to scale from January to December 2022 in order to save the livelihoods and therefore the lives of 4.98 million rural people across the four countries and the risks associated with an insufficient or untimely response. The timeframe for the plan has been extended from June to December 2022. FAO is urgently requesting USD 172 million to provide critical assistance to rural populations, prevent the further worsening of hunger and malnutrition, safeguard livelihoods, as well as prevent displacement and further increases in humanitarian needs in 2022.
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    Booklet
    FAO in Somalia 2019 Drought Action Plan
    An urgent call for humanitarian action in rural Somalia
    2019
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    Somalia is experiencing a severe drought across most of the country. Based on rain performance so far, the upcoming Gu harvest will likely be half of a normal year at best. This is especially grim as Somalia produces only around one-third of its cereal requirements in a normal year. Livestock are in extremely poor condition and risk dying in large numbers if the rains continue to be poor. Around 2.2 million people are projected to face acute food insecurity by September 2019 - a more than 40 percent increase than the number projected in January this year. A further 3.2 million people are expected to struggle just to meet minimum food requirements over the same period. Communities that were already vulnerable due to past droughts are again facing severe hunger and water scarcity and are at risk from deadly communicable diseases and hunger. Somalia’s overall Humanitarian Response Plan for 2019, requiring USD1.08 billion, is only 22 percent funded. This Drought Action Plan outlines urgent action to halt and reverse these worsening trends in rural areas and prevent displacement. It revisits the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) for Somalia, which took into account a much smaller population in need after the Post-Gu 2018 assessment, when drought and food security conditions temporarily improved. FAO has developed this Plan to scale up its response to address time-critical needs in rural Somalia and draw attention to the critical need for funding and action.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Somalia - Humanitarian Response Plan 2018
    FAO in the 2018 humanitarian appeals
    2018
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    In 2016–2017, Somalia faced one of its harshest droughts in recent history. However, the ongoing drought has not led to famine thanks primarily to large-scale humanitarian assistance. While the last deyr rains (October-December 2017) were slightly better than anticipated, sustained humanitarian assistance and support to livelihood recovery are needed in 2018 to prevent further deterioration of the food security and nutrition situation. Investment to protect and restore livelihoods is needed to save lives and reduce humanitarian need and related expenditure.

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