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GIEWS Update: Mongolia - 12 September 2017









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Special Report - FAO/WFP Crop and Livestock Assessment Mission to Mongolia 2017
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    An FAO/WFP Crop and Livestock Assessment Mission visited Mongolia from 15 to 28 October 2017, prompted by the prolonged drought from mid-May to end-July that sharply reduced the 2017 crop output and depleted rangeland conditions, raising serious concerns over the impact on the livestock ahead of the winter/spring period. The Mission estimated the impact of the dry weather on the 2017 wheat, potatoes and vegetable production and forecast the expected wheat deficit for 2017/18 marketing year (October/September). The Mission assessed also the impact of the dry weather on hay production and fodder supplies for the livestock sector for the forthcoming winter/spring months, up to April 2018. Furthermore, the mission assessed the impact of the drought on households, their coping strategies and contingency plans in view of the coming winter.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Crop Prospects and Food Situation - No. 1 April 2006 2006
    World cereal production in 2006 is forecast to decline marginally from last year's good level. Wheat output is expected to decrease reflecting smaller crops in the United States and the CIS in Europe, due to adverse weather. Production of coarse grains is tentatively forecast to decline mostly as a result of reduced plantings anticipated in the United States. Rice output may increase as very early prospects are favourable. In Eastern Africa, recent rains eased somewhat drought conditions i n the pastoral areas of the Horn, where 7.9 million people require emergency food aid. In Southern Africa, the 2006 maize crop, being gathered, has recovered from last year's drought-affected harvest in most countries of the subregion. However in South Africa and Angola, production will decline. In North Africa, bumper wheat and barley crops are in prospect. In Asia, the outlook for the 2006 wheat crop, being harvested, has deteriorated in India, but it is positive in other main producers of the region. Emergency assistance in needed in Mongolia and Timore-Leste following a sharply reduced 2005 cereal production. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the 2006 wheat output is anticipated substantially up in Mexico. In South America, maize output is forecast as sharply down in Argentina but production will recover in Brazil. However, rice crop in Brazil is put well below the record level of 2005. In Paraguay, the soybean crop will be again severely reduced by dry weather. A larger 2006 wheat crop is forecast in the EU but production is expected to decline in the United States. In the Russian Federation and Ukraine this year's wheat production is put sharply down due to abnormally cold winter.
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    Newsletter
    GIEWS FPMA Bulletin #5, 12 June 2017 2017
    International wheat prices followed mixed trends in May, increasing in North America and the European Union due to unfavourable weather developments but down slightly in the Black Sea region and Argentina. Export prices of maize remained generally unchanged, while rice quotations were underpinned by strong demand. In Asia, rice prices rose sharply to record highs in Bangladesh, reflecting tighter supplies due to reduced production and imports in 2016, along with flood‑related damages to the 20 17 main season crop. Rice price increases were also recorded in the main exporting countries, while they remained relatively stable elsewhere. In East Africa, cereal prices continued to rise in several countries in May, reaching record to near-record levels. Seasonal patterns were exacerbated by reduced supplies from the drought-affected 2016 second season outputs and by uncertain prospects for the upcoming 2017 harvests due to poor rains and crop pests. In West Africa, coarse grain prices in creased seasonally in May and reached levels above those a year earlier, particularly in Niger, due to localized production shortfalls last year and reduced imports. In Nigeria, the substantial depreciation of the local currency continued to underpin food prices, with further support provided by high transport costs and insecurity.

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