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Enhancing the Role of Smallholder Farmers in Achieving Sustainable Food and Nutrition Security









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    Project
    Technical Assistance for Enhanced Maize and Vegetable Production in Support of Smallholder Farmers - TCP/SWA/3707 2022
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    In Eswatini, food and nutrition security is increasingly threatened by climate change and persistent pre and post harvest crop losses Climate variability exposes smallholder farmers and poor, rural populations to droughts and inconsistent rain patterns This further puts food production, including of horticultural crops that are important off season sources of food and income for many farmers in the country, at risk Several institutional efforts have been made to address the situation, including the prioritization of improved maize productivity and the strengthening of horticulture production and marketing There is a further need to invest in technologies that can help adapt to the effects of climate change, such as tunnels for vegetable production These technologies can reduce pests, diseases and crop losses and improve productivity and youth participation in agriculture, leading to income generation for smallholder farmers and enhanced food and nutrition security.
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    Document
    52 Profiles on Agroecology: Improving food security, nutrition and income of tribal smallholder farmers in Sundagarh District, Odisha, India 2017
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    More than a thousand smallholder farmers from predominantly tribal Sundargarh district have been supported to adopt or extend locally appropriate, low-cost, sustainable farming practices to improve food and nutritional security and increase income. The Centre for Integrated Rural and Tribal Development (CIRTD), a long term partner of ActionAid India in Sundargarh district of Odisha, has implemented the project, “Enhancing income and securing the food and nutrition of Small and Marginal Farmers t hrough Promotion of Sustainable Agriculture in Rainfed Region”. CIRTD works predominantly in securing the rights and enhancing the livelihoods of marginal tribal and other forest dwellers, women and other smallholder farmers.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Improving plant nutrient management for better farmer livelihoods, food security and environmental sustainability
    Proceedings of a regional workshop
    2006
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    Agricultural development in Asia-Pacific during the last decades has concentrated on two basic short-term objectives: improving crop yields and improving the incomes of small and resource poor farmers. In most instances, government policy-makers focused on providing support to proper and balanced plant nutrition. Fertilizers heavily favored Urea whose impact on the physical appearance of plants is easily recognizable by farmers. The net result was the excessive use of Urea which eventually cr eated an unfavorable imbalance of Nitrogen with Phosphorous and Potassium nutrients. This imbalance has been recognized as the emerging major culprit in the decline and stagnation of food crop production and the general decline in soil fertility and production capacity in practically all countries in Asia and the Pacific region. A case in point was cited by the experience in India which reported that, as food production increased with time, the number of elements becoming deficient in soils a nd crops also increased. Micronutrient deficiencies in soils over long periods of nutrient imbalance in intensively used croplands are also emerging as yield limiting factors. As a way to strengthen awareness and improve common understanding of the complex dynamics of sustainable crop production, soil nutrient management and soil stability, the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific conducted a regional workshop from 12 to 16 December 2005 in Beijing, China on improving plant nutrient m anagement for better farmer livelihoods, food security and environmental sustainability. Participants from 17 countries in the region discussed and identified country-relevant issues and exchanged ideas and recommendations to collectively formulate technical and policy measures on developing both country and region options for making integrated plant nutrient management the alternative technology for sustainable crop production and soil fertility management. It is hoped that this will enhance the capacity of farmers to use organic and inorganic fertilizers safely and help protect the regions' soil resources. The report contains recommendations, conclusions and country papers.

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