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Strengthening Institutional Capacities to Effectively Deliver the Malabo Implementation Strategy and Road Map - TCP/RAF/3607









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    Mainstreaming Implementation Instruments into the Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Program (CAADP) - TCP/RAF/3610 2020
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    Given that agriculture is an important driving economic force of all African economies, many national, subregional and regional cooperation efforts on sustainable agricultural development have been at the top of the agendas of African countries as they work towards the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, especially in relation to tackling the continent’s high rates of poverty and food insecurity and malnutrition. Acute and chronic malnutrition among children, in particular, represent considerable socioeconomic hardships and forgone opportunities for sustainable economic growth, shared prosperity and the right to food for all. Against this backdrop, the African Union (AU) Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP), established by the AU Assembly of Heads of State and Government through the 2003 Maputo Declaration on Agriculture and Food Security in Africa, was developed to improve food security and nutrition and increase incomes throughout Africa’s largely agriculture-based economies. The CAADP aims to reposition agriculture at the centre of Africa’s development agenda and has, since 2003, enabled countries to address key transformational issues embedded in, or closely linked to, agriculture. Many countries have improved agricultural development planning and policy design processes, with over 40 of them implementing National Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans (NAFSIPs). Likewise, Regional Economic Communities (RECs) are adding value to national initiatives through the formulation and implementation of Regional Agriculture and Food Security Investment Plans (RAFSIPs). The CAADP is recognized as the flagship strategy guiding agricultural development in Africa, tailored to and driven by each country. Even though new investment streams have been identified and average public expenditure for agriculture doubled since the adoption of the CAADP, not all countries follow this trend. Private investment for agricultural development has been constrained by insufficient enabling environments and intersectoral coordination of agricultural, trade and industrial development plans to incentivize investments. In addition, lending risks associated with the uncertainty and variability of agricultural outputs and incomes, insecure land tenure issues, gender inequality in access to credit and disincentives to lend to rural, unemployed youth have prevented the African agricultural development agenda from being more inclusive. Low investment in agricultural research and slow adoption of modern farming, mechanization and post-harvest technologies have impacted productivity, which has grown at half the rate of agriculturalsectors in other developing regions.
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    Strengthening Ecowas Capacities for the Promotion of Productive and Sustainable Agriculture in West Africa - GCP/RAF/461/SPA 2021
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    Agriculture is the most crucial sector of the economies of West African countries, as it ensures the food and nutrition security of millions of people. As part of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP), adopted in 2003, African heads of state and of government committed to dedicating at least 10 percent of their budgets to agriculture. In this context, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in 2005 drafted its agricultural policy (ECOWAP), which was aimed at encouraging its member states and supporting them in orienting their commercial and macro economic policies towards the acceleration of agricultural development and the reduction of poverty in the region. The project was designed to support the implementation of the CAADP/ECOWAP, both at regional level, through capacity building for ECOWAS in terms of investment programme /project design and management and resource mobilization, and at national level, with support for the operationalization of the National Agriculture Investment Programme (NAIPs) of selected countries.
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    Framework for boosting intra-African trade in agricultural commodities and services 2021
    The African agricultural and food market is expanding quickly as indicated by World Bank projections that show that the value of Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness industry is expected to more than triple to reach USD 1 trillion by 2030, compared to 2010 (World Bank, 2013). This provides an opportunity to not only boost trade in food and non-food agricultural commodities and services within the continent but also enhance food security in Africa. Regional integration is also gaining momentum as evidenced by progress in the creation of customs unions and the initial steps in setting up a common external tariff at the regional level in a number of regional economic communities (RECs) such as the East African Community (EAC) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). The establishment of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) further reinforces the gains achieved in regional integration and opens new market opportunities for farmers and other economic operators. It has been shown that the export of higher value-added products made in Africa is greater in regional markets than in external markets outside Africa, which are typically dominated by raw material exports. However, more than a decade after the adoption of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) in Maputo in 2003 by the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) in response to the stagnation of African agriculture, Africa continues to remain a marginal player, accounting for only 2.7 percent of world trade in goods and 5 percent of world agricultural trade (Bouët and Odjo, 2019). These figures are likely to trend downwards significantly in the near term due to the economic shock caused by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. The continent currently depends to a significant degree on extra-African sources for imports of food and agricultural products. The share of intra-African agricultural trade has been consistently below 20 percent in recent decades (Bouët and Odjo, 2019; AGRA, 2019). Comparable figures for intraregional agricultural trade are higher for Asia and Europe (more than 60 percent).

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