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Agricultural cooperatives: paving the way for food security and rural development







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    Report of the FAO/SPC Pacific Islands Regional Consultation on the Development of Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries, Noumea, New Caledonia, 12-14 June 2012 2012
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    During its twenty-ninth Session in 2011, the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) approved the development of a new international instrument on small-scale fisheries in the form of international guidelines (SSF Guidelines). The strategic development process of these SSF Guidelines consists in an extensive consultation process with governments, regional organizations, civil society organizations and small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities. In this context, a Pacific Islands Regional Consultation on the Development of Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries was co-organized by FAO and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) from 12-14 June 2012 in Noumea, New Caledonia. The consultation brought together 38 participants representing governments, the fishing industry and civil society organizations (CSOs) from 17 countries and territories in the Pacific Islands region to share experiences with small-scale fisheries policies and practices. The consulta tion also discussed the thematic areas of the Zero Draft of the International Guidelines on Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the context of the Pacific Islands region and provided advice for improvement. The consultation confirmed the importance of small-scale fisheries as a livelihood contributing to food and nutrition security, poverty alleviation and economic development in the Pacific Islands region which has to face challenges from population growth and climate change imp acts and suffers from geographical remoteness. The SSF Guidelines were perceived as an important tool for securing sustainable small-scale fisheries governance and development. In terms of governance of rights, resource management and stewardship, customary right systems are a fundamental part of most fishery governance systems in the region. Fishing communities are integrated and generally have an equitable rather than a marginalized role in society. In the Pacific Island Region fishing i s in fact a respected and acknowledged profession, not an activity of last resort. Still, the consultation agreed on the importance of encouraging policies to protect small-scale fisheries livelihoods, to promote income opportunities and to emphasize the socio-economic and cultural importance of small-scale fisheries. Newly established or strengthened fishing community associations are expected to play an important role in this regard.
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    Project
    Population and development in fishing communities: The challenge ahead 1994
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    The populations in all IDAF countries grew substantially during the last three decades, thereby hampering overall economic growth. Despite remarkable increases in agricultural production including fish, food supply could not keep pace with population growth. The population of the region will continue to grow fast in the years to come and is - based on its current average annual growth rate of 3% - expected to double in about 25 years. The implicationc of further population growth for the art isanal fisheries sector, which plays a crucial role within the region as a provider of employment and animal protein, are threefold: (i) the increasing number of (young) people entering the labour force market challenges the labour absorbing capacity of the sector; (u) increased fishing effort is putting pressure on limited resources; and (iii) the increasing demand for (cheap) animal protein challenges the potential of the fishery resource. Any efforts to develop appropriate strategies fo r a sustainable exploitation of the fishery resources harmonized with the increasing demands for employment, income and food of a growing population have to be based on the active participation of the fisherfolk themselves. Consequently, the design of such strategies requires a better knowledge of the perceptions of fisherfolk on population-development interrelationships, their view on the sustainability of artisanal fisheries and its role in providing the livelihood for their children in the future. In this context, IDAF undertook three case studies during 1992-93, one each in The Gambia, Ghana and Nigeria with the following objectives: t> to appraise the level of awareness amongst fisherfolk in the target communities on the interrelationships between population, resources, and the socio-economic environment; t> to assess the population and development concerns and advise on (i) potential fisheryoriented interventions; and (ii) potential population-oriented interventions. Based on their own past experience or even that of several generations, fisherfolk generally consider fishing and related activities as good occupations providing adequate employment, income and food. The introduction of improved fishing technology during the last decades pushed the sector substantially in terms of production. During the past few years,however, fisherfolk in all communities investigated observe declining catches, while at the same time the general cost of living are felt to have incre ased. The majority of fisherfolk people is taking the richness of the fishery resource as granted, and consequently they make mainly the lack of fishing inputs due to unavailability or high prices responsible for the prevailing lower catches. Some fisherfolk are, however, concerned about the increasing number of fishermen exploiting the given resources and link this directly to declining catches.They are apparently aware of the limited nature of the fishery resource and, hence, the need for co nservation efforts.One overwhelming finding of the studies is the importance given to formal education.
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    Article
    Korea-Indonesia peatland restoration cooperation: Challenges and opportunities to recover degraded peatland ecosystem in Londerang peat protected forest
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Indonesia harbors around 24 million hectares of peatland or approximately 23% of the world’s tropical peat ecosystem. Some of them can be found in Londerang Peat Protected Forest that belongs to Jambi Province which has suffered from the repeated forest and land fires that were recorded both in 2015 and 2019. Several concerns have arisen from this disaster, including the degradation of the peatland ecosystem and wide-ranging socio-economic issues at the regional, national, and international level, and raising concerns from the global society. In response to these issues and to strengthen the international cooperation between the Government of the Republic of Korea and the Republic of Indonesia, both parties established joint cooperation titled “Restoration of Burnt Peatland in Jambi”. The project was carried out through several activities. To maintain the groundwater table, the hydrological function is restored by constructing canal blocking and water table monitoring system. Revegetation is carried out by planting native peatland species with a high survival rate. Ten villages were revitalized in order to improve their socio-economic welfare by encouraging active participation from local communities. In addition, a peatland education center was built to raise public awareness about the significance of the peatland ecosystem. This paper aims to identify the challenges and opportunities of the Korea-Indonesia peatland restoration project in Jambi province. Qualitative descriptive approach was used along with literature study. The result showed that active participation and effective communication between all stakeholders played a huge role in the successful implementation of international forestry cooperation. Keywords: peatland restoration, international cooperation, Korea, Indonesia ID: 3623058

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