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Brochure of "Reduction of Environmental Impact from Tropical Shrimp Trawling, throught the Introduction of Bycatch Reduction Technologies and Change of Management" /







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    Book (stand-alone)
    A guide to bycatch reduction in tropical shrimp-trawl fisheries (Revised Edition)
    REBYC - Reduction of Environmental Impact from Tropical Shrimp Trawling, Through the Introduction of By-catch Reduction Technologies and Change of Management
    2007
    Bycatch is the unwanted or non-target part of the catch taken by fishermen. It is either discarded at sea or used for human or animal consumption. The capture of bycatch may pose a threat to species diversity and ecosystem health because this part of the catch is usually unregulated. In tropical shrimp-trawl fisheries, bycatch often consists of juvenile food-fish species and is therefore a threat to food security and sustainable fisheries production. Bycatch is a global problem that must be addressed. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is addressing this problem through the technical project, 'Reduction of discards and environmental impact from fisheries. Under this project FAO is executing a five-year global project funded by the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) titled, Reduction of environmental impacts from tropical shrimp trawling, through the introduction of bycatch reduction technologies and change of management. Twelve countrie s1 from Latin America, the Caribbean, West Africa, Southeast Asia and the Gulf region, and one inter-governmental organization2 are also participating in this project. A Guide to Bycatch Reduction in Tropical Shrimp-Trawl Fisheries is a result of this project. It is designed for fishermen, net makers, fishing technologists and others interested in a practical guide to the design, use and operation of effective bycatch reduction devices. Fishery managers, policy-makers and legislators w ill find this guide useful to help develop specifications governing the design and application of these devices in a shrimptrawl fishery. The issue of bycatch is not going away and scrutiny of fishing activity is increasing. All fishermen are strongly urged to use appropriate bycatch reduction measures to help maintain the productivity of the fishery and the long term prosperity of the fishing industry. By responding appropriately, fishermen can help to protect the marine environment and assist global food security both now and in the future.
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    Book (series)
    Report of the four GEF/UNEP/FAO Regional Workshops on Reducing the Impact of Tropical Shrimp Trawl Fisheries. Lagos, Nigeria, 15-17 December 1999. Puntareñas, Costa Rica, 15-17 January 2000. Teheran, Iran, 28 February - 1 March 2000. Denpasar, Bali, Indon 2000
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    As part of the development of the project “Reducing the impact of tropical shrimp trawling fisheries on living marine resources through the adoption of environmentally friendly techniques and practices”, mainly funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), four regional workshops were conducted during the period between December 1999 and March 2000 in Nigeria, Costa Rica, Iran and Indonesia. The main objectives of the workshops were to review the situation with regard to impact on the envir onment of shrimp trawling in each of the four regions and in the 13 participating countries in particular, and to discuss and agree on regional priorities and content of a possible main phase project. Reports from baseline studies in each of the 13 countries were presented. The most serious problems identified were capture and discard of juvenile food fish and high discard levels of most non-shrimp catch. It was also reported that more and more countries are introducing regulations to reduce d iscarding of bycatch. In some countries collecting, landing, processing and selling bycatch has become a new and viable occupation for coastal communities. Reduced shrimp catches and different levels of management action, like seasonal closure and mesh size regulations were reported by some countries. Conflicts about the use of fishing grounds and resources between industrial and artisanal fishers was reported to be widespread. The impact of trawling on the bottom habitat is an area where little knowledge exists among the participating countries. It was, however, realized that such impact might be important for some areas and the need for research within this field was stressed. Some countries have in their regulations the mandatory use of the Turtle Excluder Device, but many of these reported low compliance with such regulations.

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