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Synergizing sustainability: Community-led agroforestry and agroecology practices










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    Project
    Sustainable Livelihoods and Climate Resilience through Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) and Agroforestry (AF) Best Practices in the Northwestern Mountainous Region of Viet Nam - TCP/VIE/3701 2023
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    The six northwestern provinces of Viet Nam Hoa Binh Son La, Dien Bien, Lai Chau, Yen Bai and Lao Cai are endowed with rich natural resources that play a crucial role in watershed management for such key river systems as the Da and Ma rivers The six provinces cover a total land area of approximately 5 64 million ha and provide a home to 4 43 million people, of whom 3 35 million are ethnic minorities The provinces are among the poorest regions of the country, with more than 80 percent of the population dependent on agriculture for its livelihood The region has 3 9 million ha of agriculture and forestry land, of which 80 percent is dedicated to forestry and 20 percent to farming In addition to the effect of population pressure on arable land, the expansion of agricultural production onto hilly and sloping land, and the prevalence of maize mono cropping have caused serious deforestation, the degradation of agro ecosystems and landscape fragmentation In addition, the region is characterized by fragile ecosystems, unstable geology and complex topography, and is highly vulnerable to climate change and natural disasters Despite this crucial situation, the introduction of important counter measures, such as tree based intercropping, remains limited Barriers to the large scale adoption of such practices in the region include widespread outdated cultivation practices, a lack of knowledge of climate smart agriculture ( and agroforestry ( practices and significant investment requirements In addition, given the prevalence of monoculture, there is little incentive for farmers, who have limited access to education and an extension system, to diversify their income The aim of the project was thus to enhance the capacities of the government and upland communities to scale up CSA/AF best practices in the Northwestern Mountainous Region of Viet Nam.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Compendium of community and indigenous strategies for climate change adaptation
    Focus on addressing water scarcity in agriculture
    2021
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    Climate change is a major challenge for life on Earth. It is mainly manifested through modifications of average temperature, rainfall intensity and patterns, winds and solar radiation. These modifications significantly affect basic resources, such as land and water resources. Populations at disproportionately higher risk of adverse consequences with global warming of 1.5°C and beyond include disadvantaged and vulnerable populations, some indigenous peoples, and local communities dependent on agricultural or coastal livelihoods (IPCC, 2018). Therefore, adaptation measures are recommended in order to cope with climate change. Indigenous peoples have developed practices for climate change adaptation, based on their long-term experience with adverse climatic effects. There was thus a need to identify such practices as they could be effectively mainstreamed in community-based adaptation programmes. This report makes an inventory of indigenous and community adaptation practices across the world. The inventory was mainly done through literature review, field work and meetings with selected organisations. The case studies documented are categorized in five technologies and practices themes, including: (1) Weather forecasting and early warning systems; (2) Grazing and Livestock management; (3) Soil and Water Management (including cross slope barriers); (4) Water harvesting (and storage practices); (5) Forest Management (as a coping strategy to water scarcity), and; (6) Integrated wetlands and fisheries management. These were then related to the corresponding main agro-ecological zones (AEZ), namely arid, semi-arid, sub-humid, humid, highlands and coastal and wetlands. The AEZ approach was considered as an entry-point to adopting or adapting an existing indigenous strategy to similar areas. Challenges that threaten the effectiveness of indigenous and community adaption strategies were identified. These challenges include climate change itself (which is affecting the indicators and resources used by communities), human and livestock population growth (which is increasing pressure on natural resources beyond their resilience thresholds), current institutional and political settings (which limit migrants’ movements and delimits pieces of usable land per household), cultural considerations of communities (such as taboos and spiritual beliefs), and the lack of knowledge transfer to younger communities. Indigenous knowledge provides a crucial foundation for community-based adaptation strategies that sustain the resilience of social-ecological systems at the interconnected local, regional and global scales. In spite of challenges and knowledge gaps, these strategies have the potential of being strengthened through the adoption and adaptation of introduced technology from other communities or modern science. Attention to these strategies is already being paid by several donor-funded organisations, although in an uncoordinated manner.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Final Report of the Regional Meeting on Agroecology in sub-Saharan Africa 2016
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    The Multistakeholder Consultation on agroecology for sub-Saharan Africa was held in Dakar, Senegal on 5-6 November 2015. Agroecology was presented as a solution to harness Africa’s social, natural and economic assets as it enhances local biodiversity and the conservation of natural resources. It also represents a paradigm shift in the way agriculture has been practised and analysed by proponent of mainstream science for over a century with an essentially reductionist approach and an increasing d ependence on external inputs. A significant part of conversations around food security and climate change has focused on production and productivity to meet present and future needs. While this can make important contributions to solving these problems, a further observation points out that public goods like social development and innovation are strong—and perhaps the strongest—levers for increasing food security. It was recognized that this requires a dramatic shift, starting with understanding the current conditions and incentivizing the systems that employ the best solutions: building the soil as a living organism; managing pests through natural practices and with increased biodiversity; and focusing on knowledge development and community empowerment at the local level. It was highlighted that food producers were the backbone of these local innovation systems, integrating local and scientific knowledge.

    Read the reports and other materials from other Meetings on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition :

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