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Business and livelihoods in african livestock

Investments to overcome information gaps







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    Policy brief
    Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050: Presence and biosecurity practices of youth in poultry value chains
    Evidence from urban and peri-urban subregions of Kenya and Uganda
    2022
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    This brief explores the presence and characteristics of youth working in the poultry sector through data collected in two urban and peri-urban subregions in Kenya and Uganda. Youth empowerment and employment have gained prominence in national and international policy agenda. The growing livestock sector has great potential to provide employment opportunities, but available evidence suggests that there is limited interest among young people in engaging in livestock activities. The sample includes mainly small and mid-size business-oriented entrepreneurs and not subsistence-oriented backyard poultry keepers. The data shows that the presence of youth involved in the poultry value chain with respect to their share in the total working age population is 16 to 32 percentage points lower in Kenya and 5 to 27 percentage points lower in Uganda. The share of young people is particularly low among producers, which may be due to high initial investment requirements. The average number of birds raised per year is lower among the age groups under 40 in Kenya, while differences in size of business are smaller in Uganda. The share of women is lower among young people along the entire value chain, which may be due to them being occupied with raising children and the lack of backyard poultry keepers in the sample. At the marketing node, considerably more young people have fixed stalls and use plastic or metal cages than their older colleagues. The data presented is on predominantly urban and peri-urban areas and the presence of youth would be probably lower in rural areas.
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    Document
    Supporting Livestock Sector Development for Poverty Reduction: Issues and Proposals
    Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock
    2009
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    Agriculture is the single most important source of livelihood for the majority of the world’s extreme / absolute (< 1$/day) poor. Since most poor rural households keep livestock as part of their portfolio of agricultural activities, agricultural populations are still increasing while land is becoming increasingly scarce, and the demand for animal source food is rapidly growing, investing into livestock sector development appears a promising means for governments and the development community to contribute to agricultural growth and thereby accelerate poverty reduction. The success of ‘standard’ agricultural development projects in general and of livestock sector development projects in particular in contributing to large-scale and persisting poverty reduction has been at best mixed, whereas policy and institutional reforms which improve the ‘business environment’ for the livestock-dependent poor and other stakeholders along the value chain have been shown to hold more promise for steer ing the livestock sector onto a ‘pro-poor’ development pathway.
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    Project
    Population and development in fishing communities: The challenge ahead 1994
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    The populations in all IDAF countries grew substantially during the last three decades, thereby hampering overall economic growth. Despite remarkable increases in agricultural production including fish, food supply could not keep pace with population growth. The population of the region will continue to grow fast in the years to come and is - based on its current average annual growth rate of 3% - expected to double in about 25 years. The implicationc of further population growth for the art isanal fisheries sector, which plays a crucial role within the region as a provider of employment and animal protein, are threefold: (i) the increasing number of (young) people entering the labour force market challenges the labour absorbing capacity of the sector; (u) increased fishing effort is putting pressure on limited resources; and (iii) the increasing demand for (cheap) animal protein challenges the potential of the fishery resource. Any efforts to develop appropriate strategies fo r a sustainable exploitation of the fishery resources harmonized with the increasing demands for employment, income and food of a growing population have to be based on the active participation of the fisherfolk themselves. Consequently, the design of such strategies requires a better knowledge of the perceptions of fisherfolk on population-development interrelationships, their view on the sustainability of artisanal fisheries and its role in providing the livelihood for their children in the future. In this context, IDAF undertook three case studies during 1992-93, one each in The Gambia, Ghana and Nigeria with the following objectives: t> to appraise the level of awareness amongst fisherfolk in the target communities on the interrelationships between population, resources, and the socio-economic environment; t> to assess the population and development concerns and advise on (i) potential fisheryoriented interventions; and (ii) potential population-oriented interventions. Based on their own past experience or even that of several generations, fisherfolk generally consider fishing and related activities as good occupations providing adequate employment, income and food. The introduction of improved fishing technology during the last decades pushed the sector substantially in terms of production. During the past few years,however, fisherfolk in all communities investigated observe declining catches, while at the same time the general cost of living are felt to have incre ased. The majority of fisherfolk people is taking the richness of the fishery resource as granted, and consequently they make mainly the lack of fishing inputs due to unavailability or high prices responsible for the prevailing lower catches. Some fisherfolk are, however, concerned about the increasing number of fishermen exploiting the given resources and link this directly to declining catches.They are apparently aware of the limited nature of the fishery resource and, hence, the need for co nservation efforts.One overwhelming finding of the studies is the importance given to formal education.

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