Thumbnail Image

Developments of Yellowfin Tuna Fishery in Maldives








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    Development of Large Yellowfin Tuna Fishery in Maldives 2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Movement behaviour of skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) tuna at anchored fish aggregating devices (FADs) in the Maldives investigated using acoustic telemetry 2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The pole and line tu fishery in the Maldives relies heavily on an array of 45 anchored fish aggregat- ing devices (FADs), making it one of the largest anchored FAD-based tu fisheries in the world. We examined the behaviour of skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) and yellowfin (Thunnus albacares) tu around anchored FADs (1 000 to 2 000 m deep) in the Maldives using passive acoustic telemetry. Eight neighbouring FADs (distance range: 30 to 95 km, average: 50 km) were equipped with automated acoustic rece ivers in January 2009, for a period of 13 months. A total of 40 skipjack (37−54 cm FL) and 21 yellowfin (35−53 cm FL) tu were tagged with Vemco V13 transmitters in January (start of the northeast monsoon, dry season) and November (end of the southwest monsoon, wet season) 2009 and released at the two central FADs within this instrumented array. No movement between FADs was observed for any acoustically-tagged tu in the instrumented FAD array. These results suggest that FADs in the Maldives may a ct inde- pendently. The maximum time a tagged skipjack remained associated with a FAD was 12.8 days in January but only one day in November. In addition, residence times at FADs were found to differ with time (month) and space (FAD location) for skipjack tu, suggesting that exterl biotic factors (e.g., prey, conspecifics or predators) might influence the time this species spends at FADs. In November, the residence times of yellowfin tu (maximum observed time: 2.8 days) were three times greater t han those of skipjack tu at the same FADs. This specific difference could be explained either by the two species responding to different factors or by the species’ responses being dependent on the same factor but with different thresholds. No particular preference for time of departure from the FADs was observed. Some monospe- cific and multispecific pairs of acoustically-tagged individuals were observed leaving the FADs simultaneously. Thus, this study indicates a high degree of complexity in t he behavioural processes driving FAD associations.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.