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Making integrated food-energy systems work for people and climate

An overview








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Building resilience through Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE)
    Moving towards a comprehensive SAFE Framework
    2018
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    Globally, nearly 3 billion people rely on traditional biomass, such as fuelwood, charcoal or animal waste, as sources of fuel for cooking and heating. The multi-sectoral challenges related to energy access make it crucial to view the issue in a broader frame. FAO’s work on Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) adopts a holistic, multi-faceted approach which takes into account the mutually reinforcing linkages between energy and nutrition, disaster risks and climate change, conflict, health, gender, protection and livelihoods. This publication aims at providing a comprehensive framework for FAO to mainstream energy access for crisis-affected population in the resilience programming.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Evidence-based assessment of the sustainability and replicability of integrated foodenergy systems
    A guidance document
    2014
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    Bioenergy when managed sustainably and efficiently can be an alternative energy source that helps reduce energy access problems. Rural and urban communities can benefit from increased access to energy, and therefore improved food security when bioenergy feedstock is produced guided by principles of sustainable production intensification and energy efficiency improvements are made by applying agro-ecological practices and locally adapted technologies.. To mitigate the risks of bioenergy production threatening food security and to harness the potential benefits of bioenergy productionFAO recommends appling good practices of bioenergy production from the onset. The production of bioenergy in Integrated Food-Energy Systems (IFES) is one of such good practices since these systems meet both food and energy demands.This publication presents an analytical framework which serves to screen different IFES options systematically and helps to define which IFES sy stems are sustainable and replicable. In concrete terms, this framework is envisioned to be a guidance document that allows its user to assess which factors make an IFES truly sustainable and which factors need to be considered when replicating such a system - be it a pilot project, a business innovation or a research experiment. Furthermore, it helps to systematically describe the potential contribution of IFES to sustainable agriculture and the growing bioeconomy, and to raise aw areness among decision-makers about which factors can facilitate the replication of such innovative projects.While the concept of IFES builds on the principles of sustainable intensification and the ecosystem approach, it stresses the fact that the diversification of crop and livestock species can lead to a sustainable production of both food and energy feedstock, as long as relevant practices and technologies are locally devised and adapted. It further emphasises that energy efficiency can be reached in these systems when applying sound agro-ecological practices and locally adapted technologies. This can be observed in many smallholder farming systems around the world, for example, agroforestry or intercropping systems that provide food, on the one hand, and generate crop residues and woody biomass for cooking or heating, on the other. However, far less common are those IFES that build on a sustainable production of food and energy feedstock and c ombine it with renewable energy technologies, that eases access to modern energy. Many pilot studies, research projects and business innovations suggest that food and energy for fuel, heat and electricity can be sustainably produced in such foodenergy systems. Yet the supporting evidence to bring these types of IFES to scale is still scarce and projects often remain single islands of success.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Turning rice residues into energy in combined heat and power systems in Turkey
    BEFS case study
    2018
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    Turkey has a large agriculture sector and relies heavily on imported fossil fuels for most of its domestic energy consumption. As a result, the country has been trying to diversify domestic energy supply and has established several renewable energy targets by renewable energy type, e.g. biomass, solar, hydro. One of these targets is for biomass based electricity production to reach 1 000 MW by 2023. In this context, this case study presents and assesses a specific bioenergy supply chain to produce electricity in a combined heat and power system. The chain considered is that of rice residues from the rice value chain in the province of Samsun.

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