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FAO Horn of Africa Cross-Border Drought Action Plan 2017










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    Book (series)
    Resilience analysis of pastoral and agropastoral communities in South Sudan’s cross-border areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda
    FAO resilience analysis report No. 17 - Analysing resilience for better targeting and action
    2019
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    The IGAD member states are situated in a region exposed to recurrent natural shocks, political instability and characterized by internal and cross-border population displacement. Conflict is the root cause of food insecurity in South Sudan where about 6 million people were estimated to be severely food insecure in September 2017. Internal and cross-border displacement prevents households from engaging in typical livelihood activities, inhibits economic growth and disrupts markets and trade routes. Consequently, income-earning opportunities are limited, and the Government’s earnings in United States dollars are very low, which has led to hyperinflation. The European Union funded “Strengthening the Livelihoods Resilience of Pastoral and Agropastoral Communities in South Sudan’s Cross-border Areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda” project that aims to improve governance and conflict prevention to reduce forced displacement and irregular migration in the cross-border areas of South Sudan. In that respect, this baseline study was conducted to benchmark resilience and food security indicators in the intervention areas and to gain a better understanding of the drivers of instability and irregular migration, as well as of the determinants of food security and resilience. The results show that households engaged in crop production and sales and host communities have a higher resilience while the internally displaced person, refugees and households residing in counties characterized by conflict and dwindling economic opportunities are the most exposed to food insecurity. The best way to increase the resilience of all types of livelihoods is to augment the assets held by households while boosting their adaptive capacity, especially by promoting the diversification of income sources and improving education levels. These efforts should target the least resilient populations in the cross border areas.
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    Project
    Enhancing the Resilience of Communities in Cross-Border Areas of Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia - GCP/SFE/261/SWI 2019
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    The Horn of Africa is one of the most food-insecure regions in the world, with pastoral and agropastoral communities in the region increasingly vulnerable to growing pressures on natural resources, upon which they depend for survival. Addressing these challenges requires mechanisms and policies that reduce communities’ exposure to these risks. Building their capacities will ensure their long-term sustainability to cope with future disasters. The Partnership Programme between FAO and IGAD was designed to enhance the resilience of communities in cross-border areas of Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia, coupled with the strengthening of IGAD’s capacity –particularly the specialized institutions –to effectively lead and facilitate interaction among its member states on policy and investments, thereby fostering the delivery of cross-border resilience.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Cross-border coordination of livestock movements and sharing of natural resources to strengthen the resilience of pastoralist communities in the Greater Karamoja Cluster
    Operationalising the humanitarian-development-peace nexus through the promotion of intercommunity coexistence
    2019
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    Frequent and persistent droughts are a recurrent feature of the Greater Karamoja Cluster (GKC). The impacts of these droughts are exacerbated by climate change, advancing desertification and the environmental degradation of rangelands. The resulting persistent food insecurity of pastoralist communities is worsened by the occurence of transboundary animal diseases (TADs) and the eruption of conflicts over natural resources within countries and across borders. The Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) decade-long work in the GKC shows that interventions focusing on livestock mobility and natural resource management play an important role towards strengthening livelihoods, sustaining peace and indirectly preventing conflict. More specifically, the sustainable cross-border sharing of natural resources and the coordination of animal movements (and the services associated with it, such as vaccination and health inspection) have been used effectively by FAO and its partners to prevent and mitigate conflicts. Interventions combining a focus on livestock mobility and the preservation of natural resources with the goals of sustainable social transformation, innovation and conflict prevention have proved most cost-effective at increasing resilience. FAO and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development’s (IGAD) Centre for Pastoral Areas and Livestock Development (ICPALD) have been the main facilitators of efforts to promote intercommunity, cross-border coordination of livestock mobility and sharing of natural resources in IGAD cross-border areas. This document presents FAO’s experience in this respect, gained over the past decade in different cross-border areas of Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and South Sudan.

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