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Co-developing a community camera trapping programme to deliver benefits of living with wildlife










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    Reducing human-carnivore conflict through participatory research 2022
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    The Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme in Guyana aims to ensure that wildlife, ecosystems, and their services are conserved and the living conditions, food security, and cultural identity of rural villages are improved. Under one component of the SWM Programme, local beneficiaries led by the Rupununi Livestock Producers Association (RLPA) had identified that human-wildlife conflict was a significant issue in the region, requiring specific and urgent attention. This case study focuses on the Rupununi region, in Guyana, in which the presence of forested islands creates edge habitats for many wildlife species, such as jaguar, tapir, capybara, harpy eagle. In Guyana, the SWM Programme is working with the local communities to reduce human-carnivore conflict by conducting participatory research with the impacted stakeholders, following a community rights-based approach to ensure that indigenous peoples and local communities were fully involved in project design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of the program. In collaboration with the communities, the SWM Programme has identified several gaps in understanding the situation to address it successfully. It is working together to fill these gaps before using the information to identify management strategies that can be implemented in the region by all parties.
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    Fostering coexistence through a poverty reduction approach 2022
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    The case study comes from Bolivia, where following a regional assessment on the distribution of Andean bears in 2010, researchers received reports from local communities regarding Andean bears attacking and killing cattle in the Tarija region, with retaliation against the bears ensuing. Researchers were surprised by these reports as the presence of bears had not been documented in the area. However, in 2016, a camera trap study was initiated by Chester Zoo, Protección Medio Ambiente Tarija (PROMETA) and the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) and confirmed the presence of a reproductive population of Andean bears in the region. These findings became the trigger to start the Andean Bears and People Project in 2018, a collaboration between Chester Zoo, PROMETA, WildCRU, Centro de Estudios Regionales de Tarija (CERDET), Instituto de Investigación y Capacitacion Campesina (IICA) and the Natural History Museum Alcides d’Orbigny. This case study describes the main findings of the project related to fostering coexistence through poverty reduction approach.
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    Building institutional and local community capacity to manage human-wildlife conflict 2023
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    This case study comes from Mozambique, where human-wildlife conflict was not a new issue in 2010. Incidents had been increasing, particularly those involving crocodiles Crocodylus niloticus, and also elephants Loxodonta africana and lions Panthera leo. These incidents impacted food security, local community incomes, well-being and safety, and were exacerbated by poverty levels. Human-wildlife conflict had become a major concern for the Government of Mozambique and led them to formulate a National Strategy for Human-Wildlife Conflict Management (2009-2014). The government approved the Strategy in 2009, and from 2010 its implementation was supported by FAO, through a Technical Cooperation Programme Project The FAO project's objective was to design an implementation plan for the Strategy with the expressed goal of mitigating human-wildlife conflicts and build the needed capacity in the country to be able to do so. This case study focuses on how capacity was built in Mozambique to implement the Strategy. By building capacity in the national government agencies, the FAO project empowered the government agencies to guide and implement the country's national strategy on human-wildlife conflict. The overhauled database, covering five years (2006-2010), was presented at the Council of Ministers, in order to underscore the importance of the situation in Mozambique, inform the Ministers of the problem, and highlight some of the tools available to reduce the impacts of human-wildlife conflict, particularly the crocodile cages that had been used and improved.

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