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Food value chain transformations in developing countries - Selected hypotheses on nutritional implications

ESA Working Paper 13-05











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    Project
    Support the Implementation of SADC Food and Nutrition Security Strategy 2015-2025 - TCP/SFS/3703 2022
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    The Southern African Development Community is made up of 16 Member States The region continues to battle against the triple burden of malnutrition undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies and overnutrition The principal causes of malnutrition are inadequate diet and diseases such as HIV and non communicable diseases According to the Joint Malnutrition Estimates of 2021 all countries in the region are classified as having high or very high levels of stunting Wasting and overweight are also of public health concern, with six countries having wasting at above 5 percent and three countries having overweight at above 10 percent Food insecurity is prevalent According to the SADC synthesis report for 2021 based on data submitted by ten countries in the region, around 47 6 million people are food insecure Because of the high level of food insecurity, most diets are cereal based and limited in dietary diversity The lack of diversity has also contributed to the high levels of micronutrient deficiencies in the region All countries have over 20 percent prevalence and many are off track according to the Global Nutrition Report The consequences of malnutrition include restricted physical and cognitive development of individuals, often leading to poor social and economic development Governments have a responsibility to create an enabling environment that encourages consumers to make healthy food choices and access high quality diets, thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving productivity and economic development In recognition of the importance of an integrated approach, SADC developed a Food and Nutrition Security Strategy 2015 2025 to support SADC Member States in addressing food insecurity and malnutrition The FNSS was endorsed and adopted by the SADC Council of Ministers in August 2014 This project was implemented within the larger framework of the SADC FNSS, based on the gaps identified by the Member States.
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    Book (series)
    Post-Green Revolution food systems and the triple burden of malnutrition
    ESA Working Paper 13-02
    2013
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    Developing country food systems have changed dramatically since the Green Revolution period. At the same time, malnutrition still represents a challenge and is now understood to encompass the three simultaneous dimensions of undernourishment, micronutrient deficiencies, and over-nutrition manifest in overweight and obesity. These changes in food systems and in the understanding of the global malnutrition challenge necessitate fresh thinking about food systems-based strategies to reduce malnutrition. This paper introduces a special section that offers such new perspectives. We discuss trends with respect to indicators of the triple burden of malnutrition to understand the extent of global malnutrition challenges and then relate those to food systems transformation in developing countries.
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    Meeting
    State of Food and Agriculture in Asia and the Pacific Region, including Future Prospects and Emerging Issues 2018
    The Asia and the Pacific region has made remarkable progress in reducing food insecurity and malnutrition over the past quarter of a century, albeit with variations across subregions. Nevertheless, the triple burden of malnutrition, the coexistence of undernutrition, obesity and overweight, and micronutrient deficiencies, weighs heavily on the performance of countries of the region. The improvements in food security and nutrition, as well as the increase in obesity and overweight – have resulted to a large extent from the increased availability of and access to food. Diets have improved in quality and quantity as overall, people consume less cereals and more livestock productsThese changes in dietary intake and quality were made possible, inter alia, by the development of crop agriculture, through the adoption of improved varieties of rice, wheat and maize, coupled with increased use of fertilizer and other inputs and an increase in the areas under irrigation. In turn, these factors made it possible to increase cereal production for food and animal feed. Improved feed coupled with improvements in livestock breeding allowed increased production of meat, milk, eggs and other livestock products. Horticulture and fisheries also saw large increases in some countries. The development of agriculture, covering crops, livestock, fisheries and forestry, 1. led to higher incomes for rural households and kept food prices lower than they would otherwise have been. These factors improved availability of and access to food, thus improving nutrition, but with large subregional disparities. South Asia, for example, lagged behind Southeast Asia and East Asia.

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