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The potential of spatial planning tools to support the ecosystem approach to aquaculture.










Aguilar-Manjarrez, J.; Kapetsky, J.M.; Soto, D. The potential of spatial planning tools to support the Ecosystem Approach to Aquaculture. FAO/Rome. Expert Workshop. 19–21 November 2008, Rome, Italy. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Proceedings. No.17. Rome, FAO. 2010. 176p.


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