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Guidance on addressing child labour in fisheries and aquaculture









FAO and ILO. 2013. Guidance on addressing child labour in fisheries and aquaculture. Rome.


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    Book (series)
    Report of the Workshop on Child Labour in Fisheries and Aquaculture in cooperation with ILO. Rome, 14 -16 April 2010 2010
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    The Workshop on Child Labour in Fisheries and Aquaculture was organized by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in cooperation with International Labour Organization (ILO) to generate inputs and guidance to the contents and process of developing guidance materials on policy and practice in tackling child labour in fisheries and aquaculture. In order to promote awareness on and effective implementation of the relevant UN and ILO conventions on the right of the chi ld and child labour, workshop participants reviewed the nature, incidence and causes of child labour in fisheries, fish processing and aquaculture, examined the different forms and types of child labour in both large and small-scale and artisanal fishing operations, shellfish gathering, aquaculture, seafood processing, and work on board fishing vessels and fishing platforms, examined the health and safety hazards of fishing and aquaculture, including the use of hazardous technologies a nd relevant alternatives, and shared examples of good practice in the progressive elimination of child labour drawn from various sectors and regions. Child labour often reinforces a vicious cycle of poverty and has a negative impact on literacy rates and school attendance and limits children’s mental and physical health and development. The workshop participants agreed on a series of recommendations relating to legal and enforcement measures, policy interventions and practical action s including risk assessments to address child labour issues in fisheries and aquaculture. FAO and ILO were called upon for priority actions to assist governments in withdrawing trafficked children and to effectively prohibit slavery and forced labour. Awarenessraising among all stakeholders and the preparation of guidance materials were also prioritized by workshop participants. Gender issues needed to be considered in all actions and issues adequately addressed relating to discriminat ion and exclusion of fishing communities, castes, tribal and indigenous peoples, and ethnic minorities in fisheries and aquaculture.
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    Booklet
    Tackling child labour in fisheries and aquaculture
    Background paper
    2021
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    The global aquatic food industry, long under scrutiny over environmental sustainability concerns, has also come under increased scrutiny within the past decade over poor working conditions and severe human rights violations, including widespread use of forced labour and child labour. However, there is limited research and documentation available on child labour in fishing, aquaculture and fish and aquatic food processing globally. Much of the available evidence is centred on labour conditions in global supply chains. However, due to higher levels of informality, limited law enforcement capacity, and so on, it is more likely that children produce fish and aquatic-sourced foods for local consumption and domestic supply chains. To realize SDG 14 and make fish and other aquatic-sourced food production truly sustainable food systems, it will be necessary to step up efforts to eliminate child labour, protect young workers against the worst forms of child labour (including hazardous work, forced labour, and child engagement in illegal activities) and invest in a healthy, well-educated workforce for the future. This too is necessary to achieve SDG 8 and ensure that the millions of people who derive their living from fishing, aquaculture, and aquatic food processing work under decent conditions. This would entail expanding attention to aquatic food production for local and domestic markets in addition to the products that go into global supply chains. This background paper presents the challenges, opportunities, and recommendations to tackle child labour in fisheries and aquaculture.
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    Booklet
    Tackling child labour in livestock keeping
    Background paper
    2021
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    Livestock farming often takes place in remote rural areas where farmers and their families have limited access to infrastructure and basic social services, notably education, health, access to clean water and social protection. Moreover, farming practices are under pressure by, for example, climate change induced changes to weather patterns and urbanisation. Therefore, many livestock dependent families, especially small scale farmers and pastoralists, are generally vulnerable and face different types of risks and shocks. Their children may end up leaving their home areas to nearby towns and cities working rather than going to school, often performing hazardous work (for example in street work). This may fuel a downward spiral, depriving tomorrow’s herders and farmers of their health and education, increasing environmental degradation and perpetuating intergenerational poverty as families opt for child labour as part of short term survival strategies. Ensuring changes to land tenure system, agricultural practices, labour divisions and protecting children from hazardous work, while respecting the cultural rights of children, their families and communities, is essential to engage livestock farming communities on sustainable pathways. This paper seeks to analyse the dynamics underpinning child labour in livestock farming and identify the strategies that governments, farmers, private sector, international organizations and others may pursue to prevent and eliminate child labour in livestock keeping. This paper focuses on child labour in livestock keeping operations, but it is also important to note that child labour may also be present in the wider livestock value chains, e.g. in abattoirs, packaging, transport and so forth.

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