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A field guide for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of African animal trypanosomosis













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    Book (stand-alone)
    Vector control and the elimination of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) - Joint FAO/WHO Virtual Expert Meeting, 5-6 October 2021
    PAAT Meeting Report Series, No. 1
    2022
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    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a vector-borne parasitic disease transmitted by tsetse flies in sub-Saharan Africa. The gambiense form of the disease (gHAT) is endemic in western and central Africa and is responsible for more than 95 percent of the HAT cases reported annually. In the road map for neglected tropical diseases 2021–2030, WHO targeted gHAT for elimination of transmission by 2030. FAO supports this goal within the framework of the Programme against African Trypanosomosis (PAAT). In the framework of the WHO network for HAT elimination, FAO and WHO convened a virtual expert meeting to review vector control in the context of gHAT elimination. The experts included health officials from endemic countries and representatives from research and academic institutions, international organizations and the private sector. Seven endemic countries provided reports on recent and ongoing vector control interventions against gHAT at national level (i.e. Angola, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea and Uganda). The country reports were followed by thematic sessions on various aspects of vector control: tools, costs, community-based approaches, monitoring and reporting. Tsetse control was also discussed in the broader framework of One Health, and in particular in relation to the control of animal trypanosomosis. This report presents a summary of the findings and lessons learned.
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    Article
    Mapping the benefit-cost ratios of interventions against bovine trypanosomosis in Eastern Africa 2015
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    This study builds upon earlier work mapping the potential benefits from bovine trypanosomosis control and analysing the costs of different approaches. Updated costs were derived for five intervention techniques: trypanocides, targets, insecticide-treated cattle, aerial spraying and the release of sterile males. Two strategies were considered: continuous control and elimination. For mapping the costs, cattle densities, environmental constraints, and the presence of savannah or riverine tsetse spe cies were taken into account. These were combined with maps of potential benefits to produce maps of benefit-cost ratios. Author’s Accepted Manuscript, published with permission.
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    Book (series)
    PAAT Programme Against African Trypanosomiasis
    Volume 30 - Parts 1-2 (2007) - Numbers 14020-14340
    2005
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    The Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Information periodical has been established to disseminate current information on all aspects of tsetse and trypanosomiasis research and control to institutions and individuals involved in the problems of African trypanosomiasis. This service forms an integral part of the Programme Against African Trypanosomiasis (PAAT) and is jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the I nter-African Bureau for Animal Resources of the African Union (AU-IBAR), the World Health Organization (WHO), the Research Department for Livestock Production and Veterinary Medicine of the Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD-EMVT), the British Government’s Department for International Development (DFID) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp (ITM).

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