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DNA-based molecular diagnostic techniques: research needs for standardization and validation of the detection of aquatic animal pathogens and diseases.

Report and proceedings of the Expert Workshop on DNA-based Molecular Diagnostic Techniques: Research Needs for Standardization and Validation of the Detection of Aquatic Animal Pathogens and Diseases. Bangkok, Thailand, 7-9 February 1999.











Walker, P. and Subasinghe, R. (eds.) DNA-based molecular diagnostic techniques: research needs for standardization and validation of the detection of aquatic animal pathogens and diseases. Report and proceedings of the Joint FAO/NACA/CSIRO/ACIAR/DFID Expert Workshop. Bangkok, Thailand, 7-9 February 1999. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No.395. Rome, FAO. 2000. 93p.


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