Thumbnail Image

Evaluating the impacts of in-kind productive transfers and extension training in Zambia

Baseline analysis of the integration of the Food Security Pack programme and farmer field schools









Correa, J. & Sitko, N. 2023. Evaluating the impacts of in-kind productive transfers and extension training in Zambia – Baseline analysis of the integration of the Food Security Pack programme and farmer field schools. Rome, FAO.



Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Addressing negative socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic through social protection in Viet Nam
    Supporting incomes and livelihoods with cash assistance in Dong Nai province
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In late April 2021, Viet Nam faced its fourth wave of COVID-19, with over 895 000 new cases reported (FAO, 2022). COVID-19 and related restrictions hindered livelihood options and vulnerable households faced financial stress to cover basic needs. Some of them lost their income and were unable to return to home villages for a certain period of time. In addition, many people living in vulnerable households did not qualify for government social security assistance. Dong Nai is among the country’s top three provinces and city areas to be hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic and is home to over 3.2 million people, including more than 1.2 million workers, of which about 720 000 people are migrant workers from other provinces (FAO, 2022). The pandemic put a heavy burden on the provincial welfare and social protection system as hundreds lost their lives, more than 400 000 contracted workers lost their jobs, and many non-contracted workers lost their source of income because of the lockdown and other prevention and control measures (Dong Nai PPC, 2021; FAO, 2022). Additionally, due to travel restrictions, many were unable to return to their home villages and join their support networks. Thus, the intervention sought to sustain livelihoods by helping households cover basic needs during these times of hardship. Between November and December 2021, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) implemented an intervention in the context of the programme Scaling up Forecast-based Financing/ Early Warning Early Action (FbF/EWEA) and Shock Responsive Social Protection for disaster resilience in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). This brief documents the intervention which aimed to help households affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions to cover their basic needs, including households already benefiting from existing social assistance and non-beneficiary households. More specifically, it sought to improve food security and prevent vulnerable households from resorting to negative coping mechanisms.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Local Economy-wide Impact Evaluation (LEWIE) of Ethiopia’s social cash transfer pilot programme 2014
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Ethiopia Social Cash Transfer Pilot Programme (SCTPP) was introduced in 2011 in two woredas of the Tigray region by the regional Government with the support of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). The goal of the SCTPP is to “improve the quality of life for vulnerable children, the elderly, and persons with disabilities” in programme households. Although the programme targets the poorest of the poor, the actual benefit to the local economy goes beyond programme beneficiaries. When b eneficiaries spend the cash transfer, they transmit the impact of the programme to others inside and outside the local economy, more often to households not eligible for the cash transfer who tend to own most of the productive assets. The impact of the SCTPP on the local economy was simulated using a LEWIE (Local Economy Wide Impact Evaluation) model applied to the two areas that received the transfer, the tabias of Hintalo-Wajirat and the town of Abi-Adi. The LEWIE model found that each birr d istributed in Hintalo-Wajirat generated an extra 1.52 birr via local market linkages, for a total income multiplier of 2.52. Similarly, each birr distributed in Abi-Adi generated an additional .35 birr, for a total income multiplier of 1.35. Thus the initial transfer of 5.58 million birr in Hintalo-Wajirat and 1.62 million birr in Abi-Adi potentially generated 14.06 million birr and 2.19 million birr respectively. However if credit, capital and other market constraints limit the local supply res ponse, the increase in demand brought about by the cash transfer programme may also lead to increased prices and consequently a lower income multiplier. Simulations incorporating such constraints find a “real” income multiplier of 1.84 birr for Hintalo-Wajirat and 1.26 birr for Abi-Adi. In both cases non-beneficiaries and the local economy as a whole benefit significantly from cash transfer programmes via trade and production linkages. Maximizing the income multiplier may require complementary interventions that target both beneficiary and non-beneficiary families.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Local Economy-wide Impact Evaluation (LEWIE) of Malawi’s Social Cash Transfer (SCT) Programme 2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Government of Malawi’s (GoM’s) Social Cash Transfer (SCT) Program is an unconditional cash transfer program targeted to ultra-poor, labor constrained households. The objectives of the programme include reducing poverty and hunger in vulnerable households and increasing school enrolment. The program began as a pilot in Mchinji district in 2006. Since 2009, the program has expanded to reach an additional eight districts (Chitipa, Likoma, Machinga, Mangochi, Phalombe, Salima, Thyolo and Balaka) out of 28 total districts in Malawi. The program has gone to full scale in Mchinji, Chitipa and Likoma and by 2012, had reached nearly 30,000 households and approximately 103 000 individuals. The SCT provides a significant infusion of cash into Malawi’s rural economy. When beneficiaries spend the cash transfer, they transmit the impact to others inside and outside the local economy, creating benefits for non-recipient households as well, who often provide the goods and services purchased by be neficiary households. The impact on the local economy was simulated using a LEWIE (Local Economy Wide Impact Evaluation) model. This study finds that the Malawi SCT generates a total income multiplier of 1.25 in nominal terms. Each Mk of transfer generates an additional Mk 0.25 of total income gain within the programme area. That is, each Mk of transfer generates an additional Mk 0.25 of total income gain within the project area. In addition, it creates a gain of Mk 0.68 for trading centres d irectly, because households spend a large share of their incomes there, and indirectly, because retail, service and other production activities taking place in the Village Cluster buy a large share of their inputs there. The SCT programme has significant production impacts. The transfers stimulate the production of crops by Mk 0.31 and livestock by Mk 0.14 per Mk transferred. The largest effect is on the retail sector, where sales increase by Mk 0.60 per Mk transferred to eligible households. M ost of this extra income accrues to non-beneficiary households, who are better off and tend to own more of the local businesses.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.